Abbi Klein profile picture

Abbi Klein Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Abbi Klein believes therapy is the creation of a special space where one can truly feel seen and cared for, allowing them to identify unmet needs and create a better life. She works with adults with anxiety, using techniques from her background in yoga and Ayurveda alongside a relational and dynamic psychotherapeutic approach to create a sense of stability and support.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • Medicare
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“As someone who is constantly curious and loves to understand the connection between things, I go beyond the more traditional approach of individual psychology in order to understand the context of our world and place within it, in order to identify change, and in order to pursue meaningful change.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
As a teenager, I had a lot of friends who struggled with severe mental health issues and I wished I had more tools to support my friends and manage the impact of watching people I love go through difficult experiences. In college, I was lucky enough to study both behavioral neuroscience and clinical psychology in research and through interning, and I quickly fell in love with the mind. As an anxious young adult working in social work, I found yoga helped me manage my own distress and those tools worked for my clients as well. As a result, I pursued in-depth yoga training and incorporated it into group and individual work. I've found the physical tools to be an important step in managing the physicality of anxiety alongside the important relational work of talk therapy in order to make deeper changes to one's self and identity.
What should someone know about working with you?
I like to start with people wherever they are; sometimes, we jump into issues ongoing in current relationships and sometimes, I teach certain relaxation techniques right away. It really depends on what support is most immediately needed. Over time, we get to know each other and discover historical facts and experiences that contribute to one's overall narrative and ways of relating to the world.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
As someone who is constantly curious and loves to understand the connection between things, I go beyond the more traditional approach of individual psychology in order to understand the context of our world and place within it, in order to identify change, and in order to pursue meaningful change. I apply a truly holistic approach by integrating mind and body and by looking at all external forces that influence our lives. I may use my background in yoga, Ayurveda, and Eastern philosophy to explore ways that our relationship to the natural world can impact our moods and energies (both mentally and physically) and I may use my love of literature, politics, art, and sociology to help make sense out of our current social-political challenges. The political is personal and an extremely important aspect to include in personal growth. I welcome all aspects of a person into the relationship as it is important to include all parts when moving toward a more integrated and whole self.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
It's so exciting to provide therapy as a millennial for millennials (although I do work with adults of all ages!), as the therapeutic relationship is constantly evolving and has come a long way since the "blank slate" model of 20th century psychoanalysis. I love finding dynamic and flexible ways of approaching this work, adapting to both technology and changing needs. I think the core of therapy is creating a nonjudgmental space to explore with nuance the challenges experienced in different relationships, including relationship to self, to work, to family, to romance, and to friends. I look forward to the creativity and collaboration of understanding these 'ships by building a powerful relationship together. I'm currently very interested in our relationship with social media and identity, the impact always being "on" has in terms of ongoing development of the mind, and our relationship to labor.
“I apply a truly holistic approach by integrating mind and body and by looking at all external forces that influence our lives.”