Alex Khoobani profile picture

Alex Khoobani Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Alex Khoobani is compassionately quirky and provides an uplifting space to work through life transitions and self-limiting cycles. She infuses a balance of warmth and accountability, emphasizing insight, relationships, self-care, and realistic solutions. Through personalized therapy and coaching, Alex supports her clients in embracing authenticity, confidence, and healing.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • Women’s Mental Health
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Personality Disorders
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Connecticut
  • New York
mic icon
Provider
Profile
“It would be a disservice not to mention how my self-reflection and healing in my own therapy have shaped me as a person and a therapist.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
As the kid of a therapist, I remember thinking that I would NEVER be one when I was a teenager. Fast forward and my first job out of college was working at a nonprofit that applied holistic practices to individual and social issues. This is when a lightbulb went off for me: I wanted to be a therapist! Since entering into the field, my experience has included therapeutic work with children, adolescents, and adults experiencing anxiety, depression, personality disorders, family issues, trauma, and systemic oppression. Topics I’ve trained in include cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, parenting skills development, trauma-informed practice, sandplay therapy, play therapy, and mindfulness practice. My recent training includes certification in treating personality disorders and characterological issues. For a number of years, I have also served as a consultant, developing and researching social work curriculum and community programming for people experiencing major life transitions.
What should someone know about working with you?
Before we start, we'll talk to see if we’re a good fit. Individuals, parents, adults, families, and friends are my ideal clients. It's fair to say that I particularly enjoy working with moms, other therapists, and folks who struggle with perfectionism and imposter syndrome. Once we decide to move ahead, you’ll find that even the assessment phase is super conversational. Building a trusting relationship and bringing in our authentic selves to sessions are central to our work together. There are no cookie-cutter approaches here! We will wade through what you are bringing to the table and identify resources to immediately get started with relief. We'll take some time to explore your history, addressing current symptoms and concerns while calling out schemas and long-lasting patterns. Interventions vary, but please do expect a level of humor and avant-garde strategies. We’ll know you’re making moves when you’re coping better, communicating more confidently, and holding healthier boundaries!
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
In the past few years, I’ve mostly participated in continuing education that focuses on perinatal and maternal mental health, infant and early childhood mental health, trauma, and personality disorders. Lately, I’m really focused on further developing my skills in schema therapy, treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder, and psychedelic-assisted therapy. I find that even though I may choose not to specialize in a particular area, connecting with other professionals and providers in the field through training and developing a foundational understanding of best practices allows me to take a holistic approach with my clients in treatment.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
It would be a disservice not to mention how my self-reflection and healing in my own therapy have shaped me as a person and a therapist. As a credible messenger, my hope is to support my clients with challenging their unhelpful beliefs, problematic patterns, and stigma around mental health and neurodiversity. My own experiences around intersectionality, as well as my education and training, really are a central part of who I am in this work.
“As a credible messenger, my hope is to support my clients with challenging their unhelpful beliefs, problematic patterns, and stigma around mental health and neurodiversity.”