Alexandra Stidham, LCSW
Alexandra Stidham profile picture

Alexandra Stidham

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Alexandra Stidham views therapy as a collaborative process where clients can build on their strengths and interrupt the dysfunctional patterns keeping them from living the lives they deserve. After graduating from Columbia University, Alexandra pursued postgraduate training in both LGBTQ+-affirmative psychotherapy and trauma treatment.
Specialties
General Mental Health
LGBTQ
Trauma & PTSD
Locations
Downtown Brooklyn
Alma Office
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Accepts Out-of-Network
Cash
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“Therapy is meant to be a safe space for people to begin unburdening themselves in the presence of someone who is attuned, nonjudgmental, and compassionate.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
I knew from an early age that I wanted to be in a helping field, but it wasn’t until my own experience with therapy that my path became clear. I’ve found that there is nothing more rewarding than helping people recognize and utilize their innate capacity to survive, heal, and thrive. For me, the therapy hour typically feels less like “work” and more like having an authentic, in-the-moment experience—where clients have full permission to show up exactly as they are. We all deserve the time and energy it takes to have a deep and meaningful relationship with ourselves, and it is my privilege to sit alongside my clients as they do this important work.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
Therapy is meant to be a safe space for people to begin unburdening themselves in the presence of someone who is attuned, nonjudgmental, and compassionate. We are all hardwired to move toward health and healing, but we sometimes get stuck because of thoughts, behaviors, or external forces. Once my clients are able to identify what they want out of therapy, I focus on helping them slow down, listen inward, and begin building awareness around what’s keeping them from living the lives they desire. Oftentimes, an important component of getting unstuck is learning skills to tolerate and manage difficult emotions and realities. I also put an emphasis on creating a more balanced life by helping clients discover what self-care practices work for them.
Alexandra Stidham photo 1
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
With seemingly endless options for therapists, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and shut down by the pressure to find the “perfect match.” I also understand that the thought of opening up to a complete stranger can be very intimidating. I support clients in moving as slowly as their most vulnerable parts need them to. The way that I like to work is to have people who think we might be a good match come in, gently test it out, and then take it from there—depending on how things feel. Fit is important and I honor people’s instincts about what feels right for them. Our guts are often wiser than we give them credit for!
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
People often think of therapy as a sterile experience for people who are “unwell” or “can’t manage alone.” The reality is that life is challenging and we could all use some help. The therapist-client relationship is unlike any other because it is inherently consistent, safe, honest, and trusting. I try to show up as authentically as possible, so that my clients feel comfortable doing the same. I’ve come to find that therapy rooms are not just places for discussing what isn’t working—they’re also places filled with laughter, connection, celebration, and the feelings of being deeply understood and learning that we’re not alone in our experiences.
What makes “trauma-informed” psychotherapy different from traditional talk therapy?
Trauma is any distressing event that changes the way we view and interact with our world and ourselves. Sometimes we are very aware of trauma’s impact, and sometimes we don’t consider events to be traumatic until we look at them more closely. By reframing symptoms as creative, inevitable adaptations that once served an important purpose—but may now be making life more challenging—clients can begin to build self-compassion and orient toward change. Because trauma memory lives in the body, I invite clients to listen to the messages that their bodies are trying to communicate. Trauma therapy also emphasizes skills for self-soothing and grounding, and may incorporate processing modalities, such as EMDR, when appropriate.
“I’ve come to find that therapy rooms are not just places for discussing what isn’t working, they’re also places filled with laughter, connection, celebration, and the feelings of being deeply understood.”
Interested in speaking with Alexandra?