Alisa Lindenbaum profile picture

Alisa Lindenbaum Psychotherapy, LCAT

Alisa Lindenbaum is a licensed therapist who believes in the innate strength and resilience of people. She offers an integrative approach combining psychodynamic psychology with the creative process and other modalities. Her specialties include trauma, depression, and loss and she sees the therapeutic relationship as an essential vehicle for healing, growth, and new possibilities.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Depression
  • Grief and Loss
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • Cigna
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses ā€” each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I feel incredibly grateful to have found my calling and honored each day to be with others in their pain and joy, serving as a trusted witness to their stories and healing journeys.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I had always been drawn to the healing potential of the creative arts. Even at a very young age, they allowed me to intuitively reflect on painful and challenging experiences and make sense of those challenges in healing ways. My journey to becoming a therapist actually began while working in a nonclinical position at a high school for troubled LGBTQ+ youth. What I noticed was the profound effect that a highly empathic photography teacher had on his students, many of whom were likely to drop out if not for the creative experiences with him that allowed for some important self-discovery and healing. This, along with my passion for supporting others and the positive experience I had working with a therapist of my own, led me to graduate training for creative arts psychotherapy years ago. I feel incredibly grateful to have found my calling and honored each day to be with others in their pain and joy, serving as a trusted witness to their stories and healing journeys.
What should someone know about working with you?
More than anything, I value the power of connection with my clients and believe that healing occurs within the context of a strong and collaborative therapeutic relationship. I care deeply about learning who you are and about your interests, needs, struggles, and desires. My office, whether physical or virtual, is a nonjudgmental, creative space. I tailor sessions to your individual needs and integrate the creative process as well as other modalities into our work in ways that feel right for you. Some clients make art, while others do not.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I strongly believe that learning on a personal and professional level are lifelong endeavors. I regularly seek out continuing education training, research, and books so that I can stay informed on anything and everything that would help support my clients in healing. I continue to create art and learn about myself as well, which helps me to be an effective therapist. Iā€™m particularly excited about the ever-evolving research around human trauma (big and small), attachment, and the mind-body connection. I am always looking to use that research to support my clients.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am very excited about telehealth! As someone who was highly skeptical about it before COVID-19, working virtually has convinced me that telehealth offers clients more flexibility in terms of their busy schedules and commuting burdens. But it also allows for much of the same experience that clinician and client can create by meeting in person. I am also so excited about the ongoing research related to trauma, attachment, and the mind-body connection, which is now happening at an accelerated speed, offering more and more possibilities for healing. Trauma was first thought to require a top-down (cognitive) approach and then believed to require bottom-up (body-based) treatment, but research continues to prove that processes like the creative arts can engage both the body and the mind simultaneously to heal trauma.
“More than anything, I value the power of connection with my clients and believe that healing occurs within the context of a strong and collaborative therapeutic relationship.”
Interested in speaking with Alisa?