Alyssa Zimmerman profile picture

Alyssa Zimmerman Psychotherapy, LCSW

Alyssa Zimmerman is a licensed clinical social worker who uses an integrative, outside-the-box approach that emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, radical nonjudgment, and mindfulness. With a healthy dose of levity, she combines psychodynamic techniques with practical cognitive behavioral strategies to lay the groundwork for long-term change and improved life satisfaction.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
mic icon
Provider
Profile
“In private practice, I continue to work with clients in the immediate aftermath of a crisis or loss and have evolved my practice to include clients interested in improving insight and self-awareness, setting long-term goals, and exploring existential issues as well.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
There was no specific moment when I decided that I wanted to become a therapist; it just always felt like a forgone conclusion. I’m a naturally curious problem-solver and developed a fascination with human behavior, development, and relationships at an early age. I always felt as though the decisions I made about what schools to attend, classes to take, and jobs to accept were just choices on the path that got me to this inevitable end. After earning my master’s in social work at NYU in 2012, I went on to work with individuals dealing with mental illness and substance abuse in inpatient psychiatric settings and community clinics. In private practice, I continue to work with clients in the immediate aftermath of a crisis or loss and have evolved my practice to include clients interested in improving insight and self-awareness, setting long-term goals, and exploring existential issues as well. I’m excited to join you wherever you are on your mental wellness journey.
What should someone know about working with you?
People are complex and don’t fit easily into boxes, so I take care to tailor each session to reflect the specific needs of the client, both in the moment and in the context of larger goals. I aim to create a safe, welcoming environment for you to share your story and for us to determine the best path forward. I view our work together through the lens of improving self-awareness, communication skills, and empathy. I don’t see any downside to becoming a more introspective, socially confident, and patient person while you’re already in therapy working on managing mood symptoms, processing trauma, or adjusting to a life change. I believe that positive relationships are vital to moving through the world effectively and use the therapeutic relationship to give clients space to try on different perspectives and practice new skills.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I believe deeply in every person’s inherent value and capacity for change. I embrace radical nonjudgment and value neutrality as tools to allow for vulnerability and self-exploration. I think that our temperament, personality traits, and past choices aren’t fundamentally good or bad; they’re just parts of our stories. Everyone has struggles, gaps in their knowledge, and a few less-than-ideal coping skills; this is just part of being human. Building a therapeutic relationship based on respect for your fundamental worth allows us to explore potential areas for growth and improvement without unproductive feelings of guilt, shame, or embarrassment.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I’m excited about the changing conversation around therapy and mental health. I’m so happy to see people talking about mental illness as brain-based conditions caused by chemical imbalances and viewing feelings of doubt, uncertainty, and insecurity as natural parts of the human experience that present opportunities for growth. I think society is already benefiting from the shift of viewing therapy as something that anyone can seek for self-improvement and wellness rather than something reserved for people in dire crisis.
“I view our work together through the lens of improving self-awareness, communication skills, and empathy.”
Interested in speaking with Alyssa?