Amanda Frey profile picture

Amanda Frey

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Amanda Frey is a social worker providing psychotherapy to adolescent and adult individuals. She specializes in LGBTQ mental health, specifically people of transgender experiences. She also has experience in trauma-informed psychotherapy and practices through an anti-oppressive lens.
Specialties
Parenting
LGBTQIA+
Women’s Mental Health (Pregnancy, Infertility and Post-Partum)
Addiction and Substance Misuse
Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Cigna
UMR
Oscar
UHC Student Resources
Harvard Pilgrim
Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
New York
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I aim to make my work actively influenced by an anti-oppressive lens, as I find that people with marginalized identities experience unique mental health struggles and stressors.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
At first, I wanted to be a journalist because I love meeting people and hearing their stories. When I was 16, I met a therapist (my own) who changed my life so much for the better that she made me want to do therapy for a living. As a queer person myself, it means a lot to me to be able to give back to my community by supporting the mental health of other LGBTQ people. In particular, there is a dearth of transgender-competent clinicians out there, and I aim to help with bridging that gap. Previously, I have worked in hospitals and nonprofit agencies, serving a wide variety of folks before deciding to go full-time with my practice.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am trained in providing trauma-informed psychotherapy and in EMDR, a useful modality for healing PTSD and other disorders caused by trauma. I aim to make my work actively influenced by an anti-oppressive lens, as I find that people with marginalized identities experience unique mental health struggles and stressors. I like to give my clients the time and space to verbally process and untangle their thoughts, but I also think it's important to provide tools to help them feel better.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
I talk about core values a lot with my clients, so it's only fair to share my own. I am deeply committed to the improvement of the mental health of LGBTQ people. Likewise, I am committed to making my work anti-racist and mindful of the fact that we live in an ableist society built upon the idea that there have to be people at the bottom of the totem pole for capitalism to thrive. It is necessary to acknowledge the mental health repercussions of living as a marginalized person in such a world, and I am always taking into account the context and environments of my clients.
“I like to give my clients the time and space to verbally process and untangle their thoughts, but I also think it's important to provide tools to help them feel better.”