Amy Palfrey profile picture

Amy Palfrey Psychotherapy, PhD

Amy Palfrey is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in working with adults and couples to address a variety of mental health and relational concerns, including anxiety, depression, disordered eating, and couples distress. In her work, she integrates elements of CBT, emotion-focused therapy, and acceptance-based therapies to help clients achieve their goals.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Eating Disorders and Body Image
  • Marriage and Partnerships
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I have always been captivated by the idea of speaking honestly about the hard stuff and of making space for the topics that don't often get spoken about in our families or our cultures.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always been captivated by the idea of speaking honestly about the hard stuff and of making space for the topics that don't often get spoken about in our families or our cultures. I was drawn to my career because a therapist has the unique privilege of being a witness to all parts of a person’s experience. During my clinical training, I sought out exposure to a wide variety of therapeutic perspectives and styles, including CBT, emotion-focused therapy, and acceptance-based and mindfulness-based therapies, all of which have informed my overall practice. I also have a background in, and great passion for, clinical research and supervision. I integrate these perspectives to create a warm, accepting therapeutic style that is informed by clinical science, and I also emphasize the unique personal values, identities, and cultural backgrounds of each client and couple with whom I work.
What should someone know about working with you?
Our work together will start with a thorough assessment of your history, cultural factors, life stressors, symptoms, and treatment goals. I will then provide feedback from this assessment and make recommendations for what treatment methods may best address your goals. I draw from multiple treatments to create an individualized plan that best fits your goals and preferences. During treatment, we will check in regularly to assess progress and adjust our treatment plan as needed. Depending on your goals, our work may be more exploratory and reflective or we may focus on developing tangible skills that you can utilize outside of session. Throughout treatment, I aim to be validating, transparent, and collaborative, and I encourage you to provide me with feedback about what’s working for you and what’s not so that you can get the most out of treatment and progress toward your goals.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I have been providing therapy over telehealth since 2016, and throughout that time, I’ve regularly considered “what is lost and what is gained” by doing therapy in the virtual space. The time of COVID was enormously difficult, but one of the silver linings was watching teletherapy take off. It excites me because teletherapy can open doors to high-quality treatment for many people who might otherwise not seek therapy, including people with restrictive work schedules, those balancing significant caregiving responsibilities, and those who may not feel comfortable in a more traditional therapy space. I have also found that there are many people who may be able to become even more open and vulnerable with a therapist over a screen than they would during in-person treatment. Of course, there can be a loss of an in-person connection, so it’s important to consider if teletherapy is the right fit for you. But overall, I believe that the increased access to care is an exciting shift.
“I was drawn to my career because a therapist has the unique privilege of being a witness to all parts of a person’s experience.”
Interested in speaking with Amy?