Amy Rushfirth, LCSW
Amy Rushfirth profile picture

Amy Rushfirth

LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Amy Rushfirth is an individual, couples, and family therapist with a specialization in working with those navigating issues of sexual identity, functioning, and expression. She works collaboratively with clients to explore and expand the unique possibilities in their lives, disrupt defeating patterns, and create space for greater connection and joy.
Specialties
General Mental Health
LGBTQ
Relationship Issues
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“My approach is relational — whether I’m working with an individual, couple, or family, I work to understand how one’s experience relates to and is influenced by the various systems and relationships with which they are interacting.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always held an interest in the stories we tell and legacies we inherit and how these intersect to shape our lives and relationships. With a background in visual arts, I find great joy in the expansive ways that we as people express and understand ourselves. I am endlessly curious about how we can embrace the contradictions within us, hold multiple truths, and allow for a “yes/and'' approach to life — all perspectives that have been enriched by my postgraduate training in couples and family therapy at the Ackerman Institute. From these curiosities and an appreciation for queer and feminist theories, I have developed a subspecialty in sexuality.
What should someone know about working with you?
I offer a warm and collaborative environment in which we work to understand your goals and history of the struggles you’re facing. My approach is relational — whether I’m working with an individual, couple, or family, I work to understand how one’s experience relates to and is influenced by the various systems and relationships with which they are interacting. With curiosity and compassion, we will consider the interconnectedness of your thoughts, feelings, desires, values, social identities (i.e., race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, or class), and how these impact the way you inhabit your body. I strive for transparency and openness, embrace narrative techniques, and encourage creative expression in order to support you in accessing a more expansive understanding of yourself and the world around you.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Therapy is not about correcting failed parts of yourself but is instead an opportunity to recognize interconnectedness and be witnessed in growth. We do not need to function alone and, in fact, will be far less successful if we try to do so. As someone who has played both roles in the therapeutic relationship, I have experienced how valuable, empowering, challenging, and joyful therapy can be. As humans, we are relational beings and our need for connection is integral to our survival. Finding a therapist is not always an immediate or easy process, yet you are deserving of care that aligns with your goals and affirms all parts of yourself.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am most inspired by practitioners pushing to expand ideas of where healing is found, what it looks like, and who has access to it. I am drawn to a therapy that deconstructs the idea of therapists as “experts” and favors practices that honor the innate wisdom of individuals, families, and communities. With willingness to face the oppressive legacies inherent in much of mental health treatment, we can create space for new possibilities to emerge —possibilities that offer deeper healing, reconciliation, liberation, and connection.
What is the benefit of working with a therapist who offers sex therapy?
Whether you are someone who has a specific challenge or area of curiosity with your sexuality, or you are simply someone for whom sex is a part of your life, it can be beneficial to work with a therapist who is trained, ready, and willing to explore all that human sexuality entails. Speaking about areas of your sexuality or sex life can be intimidating, so it is important for you to feel that you can trust your therapist to understand the role sexuality plays in your sense of self, to respect your autonomy and agency, and to be willing to move at a pace that works for you.
“I am drawn to a therapy that deconstructs the idea of therapists as “experts” and favors practices that honor the innate wisdom of individuals, families, and communities.”