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Andrew Barist Psychotherapy, LCSW

Andrew Barist is a licensed clinical social worker, practicing teletherapy in New York. He received his master’s in social work from Fordham University and completed postgraduate training in psychoanalysis at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies in New York City.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Men’s Mental Health
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Studies indicate that the most important factor in successful therapy is the strength of the therapist-client relationship.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I imagine that this question is intended to help you understand if I'm a person who can understand you. By revealing something about my own life, it’s possible that I’ll create the impression that we'll be able to relate to one another. In describing the sort of people I work with, maybe you'll feel confident that I can help you too. In my experience, these things do not correlate to how the therapy will go. I've had clients just like me (in terms of gender, age, race, etc.) and many, many others who couldn't have been more different from me. Studies indicate that the most important factor in successful therapy is the strength of the therapist-client relationship. The only way to determine how that will go is to actually meet one another.
What should someone know about working with you?
My process begins with a free 15-minute phone call so I can hear a little bit about what's bringing you to therapy, discuss what you're looking for, and address logistical things like scheduling and insurance coverage. If we decide to schedule an appointment, I find it helpful to think of our first few meetings as a consultation period where we will get to know one another and get a better sense of whether we are a good fit. This helps alleviate any pressure to immediately decide if this is the right therapy and allows you to make a decision informed by your experience with me.
If you could pick one or two books that influenced your approach to therapy, what would they be and why?
The Gift of Therapy by Irvin Yalom. Yalom emphasizes humanity, empathy, and authenticity as the most important aspects of the therapist-client relationship rather than complex theories or problem-solving techniques.
“The only way to determine how that will go is to actually meet one another.”
Interested in speaking with Andrew?