Ariana Chemtob, LMSW
Ariana Chemtob profile picture

Ariana Chemtob

Psychotherapy, LMSW

Ariana Chemtob focuses on helping millennials from all backgrounds. She uses mindfulness, psychoeducation, narrative revision, reparenting, and shadow work to bring more awareness to each of her clients’ experiences—so they can rediscover their inner voices and feel safe consistently honoring them.
Specialties
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Trauma & PTSD
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Accepts Out-of-Network
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Provider
Profile
“I’m committed to being the type of therapist I’ve always wanted to see in the world—someone who factors in all facets of life, such as the client’s upbringing, culture, race, gender, sexuality, and spirituality.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
My path to becoming a therapist was sparked by my innate sensitivity, my own exploration of pain and strength, and a fascination with the rich inner world and spirit of authors such as Toni Morrison, Viktor Frankl, and Randy Pausch. I was inspired to choose this profession because I’ve always felt energized by the idea of being a co-participant in helping others access their inner strengths and do their life’s work. I knew I had to go where my excitement was. I also was always deeply moved by and drawn to stories of people—transitional characters—who’ve faced hardship, but have come out on the other side with wisdom, connection, and love for the world.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
I work from a trauma-informed, interpersonal neurobiology, relational, psychodynamic perspective. As someone who had been in therapy for years before training to become one, I’ve closely examined all of the aspects I’ve enjoyed about my therapeutic experiences and paid attention to what was missing. I’m committed to being the type of therapist I’ve always wanted to see in the world—someone who factors in all facets of life, such as the client’s upbringing, culture, race, gender, sexuality, and spirituality. My priority is to really see and hear you. I am focused on first helping you feel secure in our connection, so that you eventually feel safe enough to truly dig deep and uncover your shadows. That’s where the magic (aka real growth!) happens.
Ariana Chemtob photo 1
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
I think the biggest barrier today for people seeking care is the belief that surrendering to the idea of seeing a therapist is giving up or admitting weakness. If anything, it's the opposite: it’s strength. It’s admitting that you’re human. That you’ve faced things that have left you feeling stuck in certain areas of your life. That you’re ready to get curious about your patterns and the strengths you need to tap into to work through them. It’s finally accepting the part of yourself that wants to be seen and heard—and quieting the stories that are keeping you disconnected from your true self and others.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Having a designated time each week when someone’s job is to truly see and hear you is the greatest gift you can give yourself, your ancestors, future generations, and every dynamic you’re a part of. It's been said that if relationships are where we become wounded, they are also where we heal. Engaging in a therapeutic relationship to reparent your inner child and essentially develop a more secure attachment style can be really transformative to our relationships, friendships, and work lives. Committing to sitting through the discomfort of feelings, emotions, and stories is essential to the healing process. Therapy definitely isn’t all rainbows and butterflies, but on the other side of the shadows, there’s a tremendous amount of light.
What excites you most about the evolving mental health landscape?
What excites me most about the evolving mental health landscape is that we’re recognizing the facets of a person that have previously been isolated from the traditional therapy experience: neurobiology, systemic racism, and spirituality. As our views of what it is to be human and the thirst for authenticity expand, our views of the therapeutic experience are also expanding to help people feel seen on all levels—not just seen for the symptoms they present with. We’re also expanding the definition of trauma, normalizing it, and helping people see themselves for the self-healers they truly are.
“Therapy definitely isn’t all rainbows and butterflies, but on the other side of the shadows, there’s a tremendous amount of light.”
Interested in speaking with Ariana?