Aryeh Wiederkehr, LCSW
Aryeh Wiederkehr profile picture

Aryeh Wiederkehr

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Aryeh Wiederkehr is a psychotherapist who works with adults in the areas of depression, anxiety, OCD, and unresolved traumatic stress. He uses an integrative approach that includes psychodynamics, cognitive behavioral therapy, and somatic psychotherapy. He received his social work degree from NYU and has training in evidence-based OCD treatment as well as somatic intervention.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders
Trauma & PTSD
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Accepts Out-of-Network
Cash
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“By slowing down and allowing ourselves to experience natural internal processes, even in small doses, we begin to find ourselves again.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I believe in the deep and infinite potential of every human being, and that includes you. I first fell in love with helping people as a mentor in my youth. This paved the way for my career and I opted to move forward in my education so I could help people on a professional level. It’s a privilege to join each client’s journey towards discovering and accessing their untapped skills, their incredible strengths, and their endless creativity. I am always looking to learn from my clients and from myself. My professional goals are geared toward the areas of complex developmental trauma and the practice of somatic and attachment-based therapy.
What should someone know about working with you?
I value the use of an integrated framework to support your therapeutic growth. Our sessions are based on what you need, but some of the things we may work on include learning to reconnect to internal sensations, emotions, thoughts, and feelings that have felt unsafe; learning to recognize how past negative experiences are stored within our nervous systems and how they contribute to current feelings of anxiety and depression; and learning to reintegrate parts of ourselves that we may have lost along the way. By slowing down and allowing ourselves to experience natural internal processes, even in small doses, we begin to find ourselves again. And we learn that we are able to bear and heal from painful past experiences and trauma. Together, we will work on building a container that feels strong enough and big enough to hold all of the burdens that once felt too painful to tolerate.
Aryeh Wiederkehr photo 1
How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
I believe in a holistic approach to addressing wellness. Therapy is a key piece of optimal mental health but diet, lifestyle, and self-care are crucial components as well. Sometimes medicine is part of the process, too. If needed, I will refer you to a psychiatrist for a medication assessment. Collaboration between different providers is essential to helping you obtain the highest level of care. We’re on a team and I value being part of it.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Starting therapy is a big step and it’s completely normal to experience hesitation. There are many unknowns about the process: “Will I feel comfortable? Will it work? Will I say something shocking or wild?” Opening the therapy door does mean opening yourself to vulnerability, but it opens the door to positive things too. A healthy, supportive framework can serve as the foundation of the life you want. Take some time to clearly identify your hesitations and then balance these concerns against the possibility for growth. This can help you decide whether therapy is right for you at this point in your life.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
At the risk of sounding a little academic, I find the neurobiological advances most exciting. Research has given us a road map of the brain. We’ve learned how the nervous system functions and new discoveries have revolutionized the thinking around integration and growth. Emotions such as fear, anger, and sadness may be conditioned and habitual flight-fight-freeze responses manifest as symptoms of depression and anxiety. Part of treatment involves shifting from the survival parts of the nervous system to the thinking and sensory-regulatory parts. This shift empowers people to connect with their internal and external resources and support systems, ultimately allowing them to heal.
“Together, we will work on building a container that feels strong enough and big enough to hold all of the burdens that once felt too painful to tolerate.”
Interested in speaking with Aryeh?