Ayesha Rehman profile picture

Ayesha Rehman Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Ayesha Rehman focuses on working with adults in a variety of different life crises. She takes a psychodynamic approach and looks at her clients from all angles to try to understand everything that leads them to the place they are now. All parts of a person’s life experience are important and need to be understood.

Ayesha Rehman focuses on working with adults in a variety of different life crises. She takes a psychodynamic approach and looks at her clients from all angles to try to understand everything that leads them to the place they are now. All parts of a…

Ayesha Rehman focuses on working with adults in a variety of different life crises. She takes a psychodynamic approach and looks at her clients from all angles to try to understand everything that leads them to the place they are now. All parts of a person’s life experience are important and need to be understood.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I prefer to work with clients who want to learn about themselves and view therapy as a collaborative journey of self-discovery.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always been fascinated with people and their emotions and how these impact the decisions they make. This led me on my own journey of self-discovery, which made me realize that I wanted to help others in self-discovery as well. After completing my master’s degree at Silberman School of Social Work in New York City, I started my career working at New York-Presbyterian Hospital on an inpatient psychiatric unit. I was able to see many different mental health issues, from severe bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to more mild depression and anxiety. After six years, I felt equipped to diagnose and treat people at an outpatient mental health clinic. While there, I continued to train in psychodynamic treatment and be supervised by more experienced therapists. I continue this supervision on an ongoing basis and continue training in psychoanalysis at the American Psychoanalytic Institute.
What should someone know about working with you?
I complete an initial psychosocial assessment, which gathers information about my client’s current symptoms and presenting problem and how they have tried to treat it. I will gather information about their past childhood experiences and their health history (both physical and mental). This will help me to better understand the beginnings of their history. I am confident that with consistent sessions and an established therapeutic relationship, my clients will feel symptom relief and whatever life crises brought them to treatment will be much more manageable. I prefer to work with clients who want to learn about themselves and view therapy as a collaborative journey of self-discovery. This takes time, trust, and an openness to self-discovery. My hope is that through self-understanding, the answers that the client seeks in their life will become clear.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My upbringing was multicultural and because of this, I have been able to see many parts of the world and interact with a lot of different people. My understanding of people's differences allows me to be open-minded and sensitive; everyone’s life experience is unique and needs to be understood. I strive to be respectful and genuine in my efforts to help my clients in whatever ways they need. I want them to feel they can be honest about my approach and tell me if I need to readjust without a sense of pride getting in the way.
“My hope is that through self-understanding, the answers that the client seeks in their life will become clear.”