Brandon Knopp profile picture

Brandon Knopp Psychotherapy, LMHC

Brandon Knopp is an insight-oriented therapist who helps clients navigate their challenges with depression, anxiety, trauma, grief, addiction, relationship conflicts, and life transitions. His relational approach provides clients with the authentic and reliable container that is needed to make strides toward their growth and development.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Religion and Spirituality
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My life has been fueled by the pursuit of profound principles, such as the reduction of suffering and the creation of a healthy lifestyle, personal growth, authentic relationships, and inner discovery.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My life has been fueled by the pursuit of profound principles, such as the reduction of suffering and the creation of a healthy lifestyle, personal growth, authentic relationships, and inner discovery. I believe that this is what most clients are also seeking when they come to therapy. Through my own work, I have gained a deep respect for how honest introspection and a safe holding environment can help one to move forward. I have learned that while there is pain in this life, there is also medicine, wisdom, and growth that can be harvested through attention to oneself. Sometimes, we need others present to help us soak in those meaningful encounters with our inner experiences. As a therapist, I have the opportunity to join my clients authentically and deeply on their own pursuits while providing support and guidance along the way.
What should someone know about working with you?
I believe that a combination of personal and global traumas and trends have left many of us feeling disconnected and oscillating between fearfulness and depression. Now, we have the vital task of learning how to reflect, attend to wounds, allow for growth, and engage with our lives in a more harmonious way. Many of my clients are adults who came of age in emotionally chaotic, neglectful, or abusive families and are now doing the work of building the pieces of healthier lives for themselves. Progress in therapy looks like increased awareness of how past traumas and the reactive patterns they create impact your way of being in the present. Through ongoing engagement in self-reflective work, my clients gain clarity on how to move beyond these patterns and live in a more liberated way.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I am greatly inspired by the work of depth psychologists who have given us a vocabulary for interpreting the ways that unconscious aspects of ourselves continually communicate to us throughout our lives. I study the psychodynamic conceptualization of client problems in order to better prepare myself for helping clients discover blueprints for growth embedded in their own life challenges. I am also deeply invested in continuing education around trauma-informed care and polyvagal theory, which helps me communicate to clients how their lived experiences impact their functioning in a given situation playing out in the present. I believe that this pairing of insight, the origin of problems, and awareness of conflicts with emotional material in the present can open the way for meaningful change.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I believe that the most powerful guidance we can attain in our lives comes from within. As a therapist, I often feel that I am a student of my client’s intuition about themselves. Many times, this relationship to oneself has ruptured for a variety of reasons, and so the work is about remembering how to listen once again and how to decipher and live by what we are hearing. In this same vein, I also greatly value client autonomy and support my clients in identifying what is most activated for them and what they would like to work on in any given session or stretch of counseling work.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
My research interests have always revolved around ecopsychology, an umbrella term for nature-based methods of healing that seek to integrate the human-nature relationship into the therapeutic process. Whether it is helping a client articulate the significance of a relationship to a place in their lives, finding nature-based metaphors that help shine a light on a client’s particular feeling or predicament, or scheduling sessions in outdoor settings, I am always considering the ways the natural world can help hold and reflect a therapeutic change process.
“I have learned that while there is pain in this life, there is also medicine, wisdom, and growth that can be harvested through attention to oneself.”
Interested in speaking with Brandon?