Cassandra Levi, LCSW
Cassandra Levi profile picture

Cassandra Levi

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Cassandra Levi is an LCSW and psychotherapist with over five years of diverse experience spanning addiction, depression, anxiety disorders, and interpersonal distress. Cassandra tailors her approach to each client’s unique needs. She is currently receiving training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy to deepen her technique.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$80-140
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Cigna
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I view therapy as an invaluable process with the capacity to enrich one’s life and render profound change and I am fascinated by the human emotional experience and the ways we seek to manage pain.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
From a young age, I was passionate about becoming a therapist. I view therapy as an invaluable process with the capacity to enrich one’s life and render profound change and I am fascinated by the human emotional experience and the ways we seek to manage pain. Throughout my career, I have sought to help clients explore and embrace their authentic thoughts and feelings; I have treated a wide range of individuals at two community mental health clinics, an addiction treatment center, and a small boutique mental health and wellness practice. These settings—along with my clinical internships at NYU (graduate school)— reinforced my awe of the therapeutic process.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am well-attuned and sensitive to the complexities and vicissitudes of each client’s experience and my style is collaborative and flexible. While therapy differs from other social relationships, I am not the neutral “blank screen” therapist often portrayed in movies and TV; I view therapy as a dyad in which meaning is reached through intersubjectivity. My clinical orientation fosters openness and trust among my clients. Although I work from a psychodynamic model, I regularly integrate other modalities such as mindfulness and CBT. Typically, I see clients weekly, which I notice promotes depth and progress in our work. In our first session, I ask clients what they hope to gain from therapy and how I can be of help. This is also your chance to gauge if my approach reflects your therapy criteria and if we seem like a good match.
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How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
Ongoing collaboration is an asset to this field and one that encompasses different elements. Whether referring clients to alternative services or presenting a case during supervision, collaboration promotes integration and expertise. I know therapists with decades of experience who devote themselves ardently to training and supervision, as they find ongoing learning essential to their work. Since there is no “one way” to be a therapist, it is vital for therapists to learn from each other and hone their techniques. I collaborate with providers to deepen my skills and thereby support my clients.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
First of all, I validate the hesitation. It isn’t easy to open up to a virtual stranger! That being said, I encourage the person to at least give it a try at his/her own pace, and—if comfortable—express this reluctance to the therapist. It is normal to be hesitant about therapy, but useful to identify what feels challenging. Therapy will inevitably evoke difficult feelings, but the process ideally yields insight and wellbeing. Once in a rhythm, therapy can be freeing and comforting, especially with a professional who is steadily in your corner.
Share a quote that resonates with you and explain why.
Carl Jung wrote, “I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to become.” Recently, I re-read this quote, which is simply worded but profound in its message. So often, we feel mired in our past, frozen in what was, and skeptical about growth. Or we feel a sense of stuckness in the present, whether in work or personal realms. Though arduous (and, at times, painful), it is possible to redirect your path as Jung relays. Moreover, therapy can be a bridge to that ideal. While the past is a fact, we can reframe and transform the meaning of our lives, an endeavor that is powerfully worthwhile.
“I am well-attuned and sensitive to the complexities and vicissitudes of each client’s experience and my style is collaborative and flexible.”