Celeste Tolbert profile picture

Celeste Tolbert Psychotherapy, LCSW

Celeste Tolbert believes the therapeutic alliance plays an important role in one’s progress. For this to materialize, honesty, respect, support, and desire for long-lasting and significant change are essential. Utilizing an eclectic approach, integrated practices, candid dialogue, and commitment to the process, you will learn essential coping mechanisms to continue your journey.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I know firsthand how vital it is to have a safe space, someone who verbalizes support and shows up through their actions.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My path to becoming a therapist was initiated by my desire to support others on their journey to growth, self-acceptance, and healing. Of the utmost importance is the role I play and how it encompasses my organic skills, life experience, and education. There were two social workers whose participation in my life will forever be valued for the motivation and support they provided. I believe they were instrumental to my path toward social work and impact my ambition and practice today. As a result, I know firsthand how vital it is to have a safe space, someone who verbalizes support and shows up through their actions. I've always been involved in the field of human service in a variety of circumstances. I’ve worked with individuals and groups in the areas of supportive housing, LGBTQI+ challenges, comorbidities (such as HIV), substance use/abuse, and mental illness.
What should someone know about working with you?
During intake, I get an idea of your needs and presenting issues as well as what you are searching for in a therapist. Only the client knows what they are looking for in a therapist and intake is an opportunity to ascertain if they’ve found "the one.” What's important at this point is the ability for both client and therapist to focus on the exchange of energy to determine if the level of comfort is there to continue moving forward. I consider myself an eclectic and integrative therapist, utilizing systems and modalities that appear most useful at the time. Healing can trigger uncomfortable emotions; as your therapist, my priority is supporting you through that wave. Progress from my viewpoint is the ability to acknowledge feelings or emotions and recover from them, having developed coping mechanisms and trust in the process.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I continue to gain insight into this work through ongoing participation in relevant workshops and continuing education opportunities. I look forward to pursuing a PhD. I am interested in the amelioration of RES, intergenerational healing, and somatic therapy. Currently, I am attending workshops in areas such as holistic healing and nutrition (and their impact on mental health), emotionally-focused therapy, and intergenerational therapy. Collaborating with other providers is an opportunity to care for a client’s mental health, physical health, and spiritual health, treating the whole person and considering how all systems impact each other. Being able to collaborate with other providers will afford everyone the opportunity to obtain valuable information they may not have otherwise.
“I’ve worked with individuals and groups in the areas of supportive housing, LGBTQI+ challenges, comorbidities (such as HIV), substance use/abuse, and mental illness.”
Interested in speaking with Celeste?