Chana Cohen profile picture

Chana Cohen Psychotherapy, LICSW

Chana Cohen is an independently-licensed clinical social worker with a master’s from Boston University. She grew up in New York City, attended NYU, and explored the globe before falling in love with Boston. She hasn’t felt the need to travel since! Chana sees clients as experts on their challenges and she empowers them to trust themselves while navigating life’s ups and downs.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Parenting
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Massachusetts
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Provider
Profile
“Over the years, I have found that therapy is not merely a place for discussing what is not working, but it’s a place filled with laughter, connection, and celebration and somewhere clients can feel deeply understood.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Like much of life, my path wasn’t linear but it led me to where I’m meant to be. I have an insatiable curiosity about the inner workings of people’s worlds and what motivates them. I’m driven by the narrative of what shapes them and how they can be reshaped. Becoming a therapist was the natural career choice to focus on facilitating conversation and introspection about these narrative building blocks and (gently) push the boundaries on who we can become with therapeutic support.
What should someone know about working with you?
Therapy is driven by you, the client. My job is to provide a safe, judgment-free space so we can examine what brought you to therapy. I focus on creating a therapeutic alliance built on mutual respect and trust. My approach to therapy is humanistic and strengths-based, because I believe that only with unconditional positive regard can clients develop true self-acceptance and reach their full potential. This needs to come from within too. I encourage clients to practice self-compassion and foster their curiosity about themselves. I also support their boundaries and help them discover and harness their strengths to accomplish the goals they set. Ultimately, I try to show up authentically so my clients feel comfortable doing the same. Over the years, I have found that therapy is not merely a place for discussing what is not working, but it’s a place filled with laughter, connection, and celebration and somewhere clients can feel deeply understood.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
First and foremost, I am a voracious reader. I have an extensive library and enjoy reading new books and research on treatment-related topics. I also participate in workshops on different forms of therapy, and I routinely listen to mental health podcasts while on the go. This all fills my tank and helps me stay current on the most up-to-date treatment options and practices. Another integral part of my learning process is collaborating with other practitioners and mental health professionals. These conversations help me brainstorm and envision new pathways to healing for my clients. I particularly love connecting with providers from different backgrounds who lean into discomfort and challenge their own methodologies and training in pursuit of what is best for their clients.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am really excited about the recent increase in awareness and conversation around the importance of mental health. I have watched therapy become less stigmatized, schools incorporate mental health education into their curriculums, and people more comfortably talk about the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics and nontraditional therapy practices. It is a big step in the right direction for people on a personal level and also on a more general societal level, and it makes me feel hopeful for what the future will bring.
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
The biggest barrier is general access to mental health care, particularly in underprivileged communities. But even with access, it can be difficult for people to find providers who are a good fit. They may wonder about availability, therapy style, office location, and whether or not they’ll connect with the therapist. To make this part of the process a little easier, I first offer a brief phone conversation to give potential clients an opportunity to ask questions and learn more about my general therapeutic approach.
“I encourage clients to practice self-compassion and foster their curiosity about themselves.”
Interested in speaking with Chana?