Chloe Svolakos profile picture

Chloe Svolakos Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Chloe Svolakos works with you to identify how PTSD and mental preoccupation affect daily life, helping reconnect the mind and body using movement, fitness, or art. This approach is holistic and unique. If you experience nightmares, anxiety, depression, anger, or trauma, she will help you rewrite your story. If you're an athlete, she'll address mental strength and health.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I now own my own practice, which blends sports psychology with trauma-focused therapies to help both survivors of trauma and professional athletes overcome obstacles in their lives.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I began my academic journey majoring in forensic psychology during my undergraduate studies. It was there where I became interested in work involving trauma and domestic/intimate partner violence. During graduate school, I became interested in international humanitarian law, specifically regarding issues surrounding public health and gender-based violence. I realized I was deeply passionate about equality and human rights and later worked for one of the leading nonprofits in New York City, working against domestic violence and sexual exploitation. I was hired as an adult counselor to help men and women learn about trauma, cope with their symptoms, and learn to move forward with their lives. At the same time, I began training in martial arts, rock climbing, and became certified in skydiving. I now own my own practice, which blends sports psychology with trauma-focused therapies to help both survivors of trauma and professional athletes overcome obstacles in their lives.
What should someone know about working with you?
"Work" means working together; I am always encouraging clients to think for themselves and I use reflective listening to help them deepen their thoughts and reach their own conclusions. We use writing, breathwork, goal-setting, and physical activity as main tools (both in and out of sessions). Homework is assigned each week. Every task is subjective to the individual and personalized for each client and their goals.
Chloe Svolakos photo 1
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I absolutely want to share how connecting the mind and body have led me to understanding myself on a deeper level. I believe that goal-setting, overcoming mental hurdles in sport, and experiencing competition have increased my ability to trust myself through hardships outside of sports. My story and personal experiences do not explicitly enter therapy sessions, but others can and should have access to the same tools I use for myself, applying them to their own lives. I believe many people shy away from somatic types of therapy and athletic movement, not because they don't like the idea but because they don't know they can use alternative forms of sport as a form of therapy. At first, sessions consist of traditional talk therapy, but the option for the mind-body connection is always available later when a client feels ready to implement movement and challenge in their lives.
What demographic of people do you typically work with?
I work with all walks of human life, from ages 18 and up. All my clients have different stories, but they all have one thing in common: They are interested in elevating their lives by being open to discovering how movement (and which movement) resonates with them most in order to use it as a strategy to cope and strengthen. Some clients are not athletically inclined at first but have traumatic experiences they would like to overcome. These clients engage in talk therapy to stabilize post-trauma.
“We use writing, breathwork, goal-setting, and physical activity as main tools (both in and out of sessions).”