Chris Ward profile picture

Chris Ward Psychotherapy, LCSW

Chris Ward is a licensed clinical social worker who helps anxious New Yorkers reclaim their confidence. Most of his clients come to him struggling with anxiety, hoping to find relief so that they can feel confident again. As an LGBTQ+ person, he specializes in working with other LGBTQ+ humans because he believes everyone deserves to feel good about who they are.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • LGBTQIA+
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Through my own healing, I transformed my relationship with anxiety, healed my relationship with myself, and reconnected with my confidence.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Growing up with childhood struggles — including struggling with my own LGBTQ+ identity — I learned empathy and took on the role of cheerleader and kind listener in relationships. People opened up to me, and through conversation and relationships, I realized I could help others feel good about themselves. So, I took my first college psychology course, majored in psychology, moved to the city for graduate school, and became a therapist. I found my niche following a workplace trauma that led to my struggles with anxiety and confidence. Through my own healing, I transformed my relationship with anxiety, healed my relationship with myself, and reconnected with my confidence. I soon noticed I was attracting clients who also struggled with anxiety and confidence; I had found my specialty: Helping New Yorkers find relief from anxiety so that they can reconnect with their confidence.
What should someone know about working with you?
You’ll know therapy is working when you can step into places you’ve experienced anxiety and instead make room for it and confidently know that you’ve got this. On the path to progress, I may give you some things to practice in between sessions but only when we both agree they would be beneficial and only after we have thoroughly practiced together in session so you are confident doing this solo. The best way to get started is to click the “Request a Consultation” button on this page. I will return your message within a business day to schedule a phone consultation. On this call, you can ask me questions, I can share more about how I might help, and we can make sure we’re a good fit for each other. Once we’re both comfortable getting started, we’ll schedule the first appointment.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
Values of kindness, compassion, and transparency flavor my therapeutic style. I truly believe that kindness is one of the most transformative elements in therapy. As a kind therapist, I also have the privilege of helping clients treat themselves kindly. Compassion, in the context of therapy, means I do this work for you; you always remain in control, you are the expert on you, and we work on your goals. Although this career is deeply rewarding and meaningful to me, this work is sacred and is therefore always done with you as the priority. To me, transparency is a backstage tour showing you how everything works behind the scenes. Like a backstage tour, I frequently pull back the curtain of therapy, being open and honest about our work together, sharing rationales for why and how interventions may help, and allowing you to remember what works for you and why.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
All the corporate talk about the future of hybrid work has me particularly excited about the implications and opportunities for therapy. Thanks to the surge of telehealth, we all benefit from a more accessible and hybrid therapy experience. It’s not always possible (read: working at home) or desirable (read: working at home in your pajamas) to go to your therapist’s office, and telehealth presents a way to continue the relationship and the work over video. And when you’re ready or able to get to the office, that in-person experience awaits.
“Compassion, in the context of therapy, means I do this work for you; you always remain in control, you are the expert on you, and we work on your goals.”
Interested in speaking with Chris?