Connie DePinho profile picture

Connie DePinho Psychotherapy, PhD

Not Taking New Clients

Connie DePinho has been in private practice for the last 30 years. Her training is mostly within the psychoanalytic-psychotherapy model, including intensive training in psychoanalysis. This model emphasizes in-depth work, helping you gain awareness of the issues keeping you in repetitive patterns and develop more functional ways. She also has training in traumatic studies.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Nippon
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My typical client is someone who is working to meet the challenges of transition in their lives, such as going to college, getting married, deciding to divorce, changing a career, losing employment, dealing with the death of a loved one, or experiencing unpredictable events in their lives.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I grew up in Africa, lived in Europe, and came to the USA as a teenager. Throughout this journey, I have been exposed to a variety of people and cultures, and I speak Portuguese fluently. My varied life experiences, including living through a time of political and social upheaval and experiencing great losses and traumatic events, have taught me about the power of resilience, the importance of connection with others in times of extreme stress, and the great capacity for love despite all the hurt that can be inflicted upon us. Living through all of that inspired me to be a clinical psychologist in order to help others who endure suffering.
What should someone know about working with you?
In the past, I have worked in outpatient, inpatient, and school settings, where I worked with everyone from children to those in late adulthood. Currently, I am in a full-time private practice where I see a variety of clients ages 16 and up in individual, couples, or family sessions. My typical client is someone who is working to meet the challenges of transition in their lives, such as going to college, getting married, deciding to divorce, changing a career, losing employment, dealing with the death of a loved one, or experiencing unpredictable events in their lives. I have been fortunate to work with thousands of clients as they navigate these challenges and opportunities.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I see continuing education as being extremely valuable. I am particularly interested in the treatment of trauma, which, by definition, is a subjective experience. It could involve a specific traumatic event, such as witnessing a parent having a heart attack, or a lifelong exposure to emotional abuse. It depends on a complexity of factors, including one’s previous history and exposure to traumatic events, extent of security and safety in one’s interpersonal relationships, temperament, coping style, and support system following the trauma (just to name a few factors).
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am most excited about the work that has been done on the interplay of the body and the mind in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and traumatic effects. I integrate mindfulness and encourage my clients to embrace other methods of healing using the body to advance their work by participating in yoga, martial arts, dance, or walks in nature.
“I am particularly interested in the treatment of trauma, which, by definition, is a subjective experience.”