Cynthia Boucher profile picture

Cynthia Boucher Psychotherapy, LCSW

Cynthia Boucher is a licensed clinical social worker with experience working in a variety of settings. She believes everyone should live life without judgment, fear, or distress and that developing trust with your therapist is the most important first step in the relationship. She works in trauma, abuse, domestic violence, anxiety, adjustment, relationships, and depression.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Domestic Abuse and Violence
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“If you are having difficulties with past trauma, abuse, neglect, domestic violence, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, career, or life transitions, I am here to help you build management and coping skills.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I began my career as a social worker with a focus on victims of domestic violence. I helped women through their healing process and became more interested in family issues. After a few years in this role, I transitioned to working with the foster care population. I spent several years working with children and developing my skills in trauma-informed care. It was at this point that I began understanding how extensive the impact of unresolved trauma has on a person’s ability to function at their full potential. This motivated me to become trained explicitly in forms of care that can help target the root of someone’s trauma and help develop coping mechanisms.
What should someone know about working with you?
I believe that everyone should live their life without judgment, fear, or distress. Developing trust with your therapist is the most important first step in a therapeutic relationship. Once trust and rapport have been established, I will work with you to develop the goals of therapy. If you are having difficulties with past trauma, abuse, neglect, domestic violence, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, career, or life transitions, I am here to help you build management and coping skills. A vast majority of my experience has been working with individuals who have an array of social and behavioral difficulties.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
As a therapist, it is vital that I am up-to-date on the ever-evolving mental health landscape. In my spare time, I perform research on new methods of therapy and advancements in the cultural zeitgeist. Whenever possible, I continue my education and get certified in new therapy modalities. I also maintain a network of peer therapists who I can consult whenever necessary.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My core values as a therapist are as follows: Honesty, commitment to equitable care, and a commitment to growth as a counselor in a rapidly evolving identity landscape. These are integral to the way I approach my therapy sessions. I am dedicated to providing the highest quality of care possible and this requires that my clients trust me to have their best interest in mind.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Most recently, I have been thrilled with the evolving telehealth platform for therapy. It has completely changed our reach as providers and made therapy exponentially more accessible. I am excited to see where this new mode of providing care takes us. In the same vein, it has been incredible to witness the societal shifts in attitudes about mental health. Compared to when I first started, people are more willing to seek help and there is generally less stigma around reaching out. Having more access and greater reach to help really makes the work feel exciting and meaningful.
“My core values as a therapist are as follows: Honesty, commitment to equitable care, and a commitment to growth as a counselor in a rapidly evolving identity landscape.”
Interested in speaking with Cynthia?