Cynthia Millin, MD
Cynthia Millin profile picture

Cynthia Millin

Psychiatrist, MD

Not Taking New Clients
Cynthia Millin, MD works with individuals 18 and over who are going through a rough patch, feel stuck, or who may have been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Cindy is a physician and board-certified in psychiatry with additional qualifications in psychotherapy.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
Locations
Brooklyn
Alma Office
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
UHC Student Resources
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
New York
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Provider
Profile
“My approach is to listen to and have reverence for the person.”
What was your path to becoming a psychiatrist?
I received my medical training at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. In 2010, I completed my residency in adult psychiatry at the Western Psychiatric Hospital and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) and completed a fellowship in public psychiatry at Columbia University the following year. Prior to attending medical school, I was a practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine and gained deep knowledge of acupuncture and herbal medicine. In all, I have over two decades of experience in Eastern and allopathic medicine.
What should someone know about working with you?
Recovery from a psychiatric disorder, substance use, or trauma is not a cure; it is a journey. Each person must discover what is helpful for recovery and what is not. Some find that talk therapy helps to cultivate positive habits and fresh approaches to challenges while others find that taking psychiatric medication is an important part of the recovery process. The choice to take medication or not is deeply personal; it is an informed decision and involves a careful weighing of the medication’s benefits balanced against its harms. The decision is not cut-and-dry; it is emotional and may even affect a sense of self. Psychotherapy and medication are powerful tools for the treatment of psychiatric illness, but they are certainly not the only things that promote recovery. Many find that the activities they can do themselves (like riding a bike, eating healthy foods, meditating, attending a 12-step meeting, or going to bed at a set time) can ease symptoms.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
My approach is to listen to and have reverence for the person. I work in partnership with an individual so that they can become an expert in self-care, regain control over their life, and be responsible for their unique and individual journey of recovery.
“I work in partnership with an individual so that they can become an expert in self-care, regain control over their life, and be responsible for their unique and individual journey of recovery.”