Danielle Merker profile picture

Danielle Merker Psychotherapy, LCSW

Dani Merker’s approach is rooted in attachment theory and seen through a relational and psychodynamic view. She believes deeply that psychotherapy is both magic and science, utilizing evidence-based practices thoughtfully with the alchemy that occurs when people enter into a mutual relationship of compassion and exploration.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Parenting
  • Women’s Mental Health (Pregnancy, Infertility and Post-Partum)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Our sessions will be filled with warmth, compassion, humor, and hope.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I began my career as a classroom teacher in urban settings but I have always been a therapist at heart. Developing relationships with students and their families was the ultimate privilege. Through my time in school settings, I began to clearly see the gaps in the ways we conceptualize education and nurture mental health. Therapy felt like the right pivot to addressing these gaps and still living a life of service. While working as a clinician, I've been able to appreciate the importance of building relationships based on mutual care, understanding, respect, and patience. One of my strongest assets is my ability to connect and engage with a broad range of people, having worked in a wide spectrum of contexts including supportive housing, schools, community-based mental health clinics, parenting programs, and yoga studios. I approach this work with humility, reverence, and curiosity.
What should someone know about working with you?
I prefer not to approach therapy in the blank slate tradition; you are coming into this as a person with experiences and knowledge as am I. I believe that our budding relationship is the vehicle for change. Borrowing from a psychodynamic perspective, sometimes sessions can be free-flowing and other times, more structured with cognitive behavioral techniques. We will be companion archaeologists, exploring what has led you to this moment. Our sessions will be filled with warmth, compassion, humor, and hope. It's also important to say that therapy is both work and a process; there are no magic pills and understanding that lasting behavioral change takes time and patience is critical to measuring your success.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I am deeply engaged in my own therapeutic processes. It is a parallel process between clinician and client that underscores both the work and relationship. I continue to marvel at the ways in which my clients are the ultimate teachers but also love to delve into my own personal and professional development. I am hungry to grow, learn, and constantly add tools to my clinician's toolkit. For example, I am really interested in deepening my understanding of intersubjective self-psychology in addition to family therapy and hope to partake in training programs in those practice areas in the near future.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I try to "walk the walk" as much as possible, keeping in mind that everyone is embedded with their own nuanced hypocrisies. We are all flawed and trying to make our way through the world, so why not do it tenderly and together? As social creatures, I deeply believe that our intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships can and should provide solace and clarity through reflective engagement. I try to strike a delicate balance between holding both myself and my clients accountable while exploring the grace and patience necessary to thoughtfully examine one's life and relationships.
“It's also important to say that therapy is both work and a process; there are no magic pills and understanding that lasting behavioral change takes time and patience is critical to measuring your success.”
Interested in speaking with Danielle?