Denise Bronzino Donowitz profile picture

Denise Bronzino Donowitz Psychotherapy, PhD, LP

Not Taking New Clients

Denise Bronzino Donowitz, PhD is a clinical psychologist with 30 years of experience treating anxiety, depression, and grief. She is skilled in CBT yet uses a variety of treatment approaches tailored to the individual. She also holds a postdoctoral certificate in neuropsychology, which aids in conceptualization and treatment planning while allowing for more successful outcomes.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Grief and Loss
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“While my therapeutic style often has been described as one of empathy and support, my approach tends to be direct and relies heavily on CBT as well as other strategies.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was introduced to the field of mental health at an early age. My mother was a psychiatric nurse who devoted her career to working with some of the most vulnerable individuals. She always viewed those she served as people first, emphasizing their common humanity. I often participated in special events or community outings on the unit where she worked. These early experiences both piqued my interest in the field of psychology and afforded me the opportunity to get to know some of these vulnerable individuals firsthand. As a result, I came to appreciate their common humanity in addition to developing a genuine admiration for their courage and resilience. Ultimately, this led to my decision to pursue a career in human services as a psychologist. I am forever grateful to my mother, my early mentors, and the opportunities I have had over the years to work with individuals whom I feel so privileged to serve in a manner that has proved most rewarding.
What should someone know about working with you?
I believe a thorough intake process is important to gaining an understanding of the presenting problem and relevant historical details in order to aid in the development of an effective treatment plan. In addition to introducing short-term coping strategies early on to provide immediate relief, treatment planning also includes the identification of long-term goals to help bring about lasting change. While my therapeutic style often has been described as one of empathy and support, my approach tends to be direct and relies heavily on CBT as well as other strategies. It is my belief that the majority of the work in therapy often takes place between treatment sessions, so I sometimes utilize homework assignments to augment the therapeutic process. Finally, I not only emphasize and value a collaborative process in the therapeutic relationship, but I also place importance on collaborating with psychiatrists or other providers as indicated.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I consider myself a lifelong learner. In addition to completing a mid-career postdoctoral certificate in neuropsychology, I continue to participate in regular continuing education courses and training (especially in the area of anxiety disorders). As a member of the Anxiety and Depressive Association of America, I receive regular updates regarding the most recent research in the areas of anxiety and depressive disorders. I also have the opportunities to participate in ongoing trainings on the latest treatment strategies and collaborate with other clinicians and researchers in the field.
“It is my belief that the majority of the work in therapy often takes place between treatment sessions, so I sometimes utilize homework assignments to augment the therapeutic process.”