Diane Gottfried profile picture

Diane Gottfried Psychotherapy, PhD

Not Taking New Clients

Diane Gottfried works from a foundation of psychoanalysis, addressing mental health issues with insights and technique that keep her clinically grounded, creative, emotionally available, and able to integrate other approaches. Her areas of interest include working with adults with depression, anxiety, and histories of trauma.

Specialties
  • Depression
  • Grief and Loss
  • Eating Disorders and Body Image
  • LGBTQIA+
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • Medicare
  • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • UMR
  • Humana
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Over the course of our work together, you can expect a decrease in symptoms and enhanced wellbeing as well as increased self-understanding and self-acceptance.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My practice of psychoanalysis is guided by the belief that the process of addressing the uncomfortable thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that we usually avoid can help us to understand our conflicts about and resistance to the discomfort. The healing process emerges from an increased ability to understand motivations and naturally-generated tools that manage stress and fluctuations in wellbeing. I have nearly two decades of clinical experience working in several different settings and enjoy working with adults across the lifespan, including young adults managing the stress of major life transitions. My areas of interest include working with adults who are struggling with depression and anxiety and those who have histories of childhood and adult-onset trauma. I have worked with individuals struggling with a range of issues, including workplace stress, eating disorders, addiction recovery, coping with a mentally ill family member, fertility issues, medical illnesses, and recent or unresolved grief.
What should someone know about working with you?
I work with people who seek treatment in the midst of acute crises or who wish to address longstanding or unresolved issues. People come to psychotherapy with varying degrees of awareness of what motivates their choices and behaviors. My intake process involves an initial appointment where we discuss what brings you to treatment and what your goals are. I will also start to gather a personal and family history and review past psychotherapy experiences to get a sense of what was beneficial. You can decide after several meetings whether you think we’re a good fit. Over the course of our work together, you can expect a decrease in symptoms and enhanced wellbeing as well as increased self-understanding and self-acceptance. I don’t assign homework, but I encourage people to continue to process what is brought up in sessions and to journal if they find it helpful. Sometimes, people choose to increase their session frequency in order to deepen and speed up the process.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I continue to learn and build competencies by participating in ongoing supervision and study groups, reading books and journal articles, and completing trainings to develop skills. I am training in EMDR and look forward to starting training in somatic experiencing. I collaborate with other healthcare professionals as needed in order to provide the highest quality of care to my clients.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
My psychotherapy practice and sensibility as a psychologist are grounded in the human experience; I believe that psychological symptoms are not merely quantifiable problems to overcome but contain communications from parts of ourselves that are outside of conscious awareness. Symptoms might feel alien to us but I believe that they emerge in the context of who we are and our life experiences. I strive to engage in a conversation with the people with whom I work and encourage them to approach their mental health issues with curiosity and acceptance rather than fear or shame. I understand and respect the fact that it takes courage to seek and continue to engage in psychotherapy and I aspire to make the process feel as safe and useful as possible. I am committed to clinically addressing diversity issues, especially around sexual and gender identity, internalized bigotry (racism, sexism, homophobia), acculturation, migration, and social class.
“I strive to engage in a conversation with the people with whom I work and encourage them to approach their mental health issues with curiosity and acceptance rather than fear or shame.”