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Eliza Jade Brown Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Eliza Jade Brown has worked as a licensed psychotherapist since 2016. She provides in-person therapy, teletherapy, and walk-and-talk therapy for adults with anxiety, depressive episodes, relationship issues, addiction, eating disorders, ADHD, dissociation, and borderline personality traits. Her specialty is addressing the complex trauma that often underlies these challenges.

Eliza Jade Brown has worked as a licensed psychotherapist since 2016. She provides in-person therapy, teletherapy, and walk-and-talk therapy for adults with anxiety, depressive episodes, relationship issues, addiction, eating disorders, ADHD, dissoc…

Eliza Jade Brown has worked as a licensed psychotherapist since 2016. She provides in-person therapy, teletherapy, and walk-and-talk therapy for adults with anxiety, depressive episodes, relationship issues, addiction, eating disorders, ADHD, dissociation, and borderline personality traits. Her specialty is addressing the complex trauma that often underlies these challenges.

Specialties
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Locations
  • Austin
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Texas
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Provider
Profile
“In therapy appointments, I provide a safe space to reflect and process and find secure support and guidance, which invites an understanding of challenges and movement toward eventual acceptance and change.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
The inspiration to pursue a career in therapy was a combination of personality testing in high school and having my own positive therapy experience after my freshman year of college. I entered my career in therapy through clinical social work. I have worked as a therapist in a variety of mental health settings, notably in psychiatric hospitals, outpatient clinics, telehealth, and group private practice. I opened my own private practice in 2021.
What should someone know about working with you?
Before getting started, I recommend a free 20-minute consultation call by phone or video. Therapy can be a rewarding but challenging process, and I want clients to feel confident that we are the right fit. In therapy appointments, I provide a safe space to reflect and process and find secure support and guidance, which invites an understanding of challenges and movement toward eventual acceptance and change. I also share my clinical knowledge with my clients and incorporate the practice of mindfulness skills and somatic work.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I take a number of continuing education units every year and, in between appointments with my clients, I read books, read journal articles, and listen to podcasts relevant to the challenges my clients are facing. I also consult with other providers to continue building and maintaining competency. I am currently in training and consultation to provide the NeuroAffective Relational Model (NARM). This is an advanced training for clinicians who regularly address underlying complex and developmental trauma.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
As a therapist, I value seeing the whole person and the whole journey, which includes taking into consideration history, environment, personality, and physical health. This is shaped by my complex experiences as an immigrant, my own work in understanding myself, and my desire to improve my own mind-body connection. I continually strive to walk the walk and not just talk the talk with my clients in the journey toward healing and self-actualization.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am excited about the cultural shift that normalizes mental health care and the expanding access through telehealth. I hope that, one day, mental health care is viewed as equal to physical health care and more therapists can provide care across state lines. The emerging topics in mental health that I personally take interest in are trauma-informed care and the effect of adverse childhood experiences.
“I also share my clinical knowledge with my clients and incorporate the practice of mindfulness skills and somatic work.”