Elizabeth Penn profile picture

Elizabeth Penn Psychotherapy, PsyD

Not Taking New Clients

Elizabeth Penn’s main focus is on working with individuals who are having difficulty in their relationships, especially in those with their partners or their families of origin. As part of this work, she helps clients identify, explore, and communicate their emotional experience in order to gain greater awareness of themselves and more satisfying connections with others.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I help clients address their goals by guiding them to explore, sit with, express their thoughts and feelings, and identify skills that expand their options for communication and action.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always been drawn to people’s stories and have been curious about why people act the way they do, especially when their actions seem to contribute to painful consequences. This curiosity ultimately led me to pursue my doctorate in psychology at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology. Through my studies, my continuing education, and my own therapy, I have learned that we are all doing the best we can, given the sum total of our life experiences. Sometimes, our best works well; other times, we get stuck making the same choices that are no longer working for us. Fortunately, therapy provides the opportunity to gain awareness, insight, and tools to make new choices that lead to more satisfying outcomes. I find it very fulfilling to use my training and experience to offer this opportunity to others.
What should someone know about working with you?
I ask questions and listen carefully to learn about my clients and understand their challenges within the context of their life experience. As clients respond and explore, they begin to identify their goals. I help clients address their goals by guiding them to explore, sit with, express their thoughts and feelings, and identify skills that expand their options for communication and action. I validate the difficulty of making change while also continuously encouraging and challenging my clients to take one step at a time to reach their goals. I often use the therapeutic relationship to help with exploration. I speak with clients about what is happening in the moment between them and myself so that they have the opportunity to reflect on their emotions in real time, observe and explore relational patterns, and experiment with new ways of communicating.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
My background is in interpersonal psychodynamic psychotherapy, which is useful for the exploratory work I do (especially with relational dynamics). I am now eager to learn more about how to help clients gain concrete skills to improve emotional awareness, regulation, coping, and self-actualization. As such, I have recently participated in training on skills-based therapeutic approaches, and I plan to begin a year-long course in dialectical behavior therapy.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I find it most useful to consider actions and beliefs through a lens of outcome of costs and benefits rather than a frame of right or wrong. A frame of right and wrong is based on value-judgment and opinion while a frame of costs and benefits is based on observable evidence. Using observable evidence rather than opinion as a base for action tends to lead to a more functional result. I apply this in my work and help each client consider what will be most functional for them in their context rather than trying to work toward any one universal standard or set of values.
“I validate the difficulty of making change while also continuously encouraging and challenging my clients to take one step at a time to reach their goals.”