Ella Lasky profile picture

Ella Lasky Psychotherapy, PhD

Ella Lasky enjoys helping individuals and couples move forward and live richer, fuller lives. She helps people learn what holds them back and what keeps them stuck in sadness, anxiety, depression, anger, and repetitive, self-defeating cycles. She helps clients develop a toolkit that will continue to be useful long after the therapy is over. The work together is interactive.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Parenting
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • Aetna
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My combination of sociological and psychological perspectives helps me to understand the unique world each client grew up in as well as their present emotional world.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always been interested in helping people. In college, I started studying sociology and anthropology. I was fascinated with the way different cultures valued and dealt with the same events. I started to take psychology courses and found that I was even more interested in the psychodynamics of individuals and couples. After I received my PhD, I went on to train in couples therapy. My combination of sociological and psychological perspectives helps me to understand the unique world each client grew up in as well as their present emotional world. I enjoy helping individuals and couples move forward and live richer, fuller lives. I help people learn what holds them back and what keeps them stuck in sadness, anger, and repetitive, self-defeating cycles. By incorporating the latest psychodynamic and couples therapy methods, I work collaboratively with clients, allowing them to make positive changes and become their best selves.
What should someone know about working with you?
I strive to create a safe, warm, and welcoming environment, a place where each client is treated with dignity, respect, and understanding. Working together, I help you clarify your goals and find unique solutions to your issues. If you are worried, stressed, or depressed, you are not alone; one in four of us feel that way in any given year. I think of psychotherapy as helping you to construct a toolkit that will continue to develop even after therapy is over. Our work is interactive and involves creative problem-solving, mini-experiments, and occasional homework. I listen carefully so that I can understand what you are communicating and then we find the meaning in your experience. Research has found that talk therapy results in solid outcomes that last long after the therapy has been completed.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am very excited about the acceptance that mental health has been gaining recently. Psychological issues have become less stigmatizing, and psychotherapy is achieving parity with physical health. People more openly discuss the benefits they receive from therapy. In recent years, many businesses have integrated mental health consultations within their workspaces. I am delighted with this cultural shift, which I feel benefits everyone.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
Finances are one of the most common disagreements among couples and families. It is a topic that many of us did not discuss growing up and still do not talk about openly, honestly, and fully. We often lack the language to talk comfortably about our financial feelings and values. I have conducted qualitative research on individuals and couples and their relationship to money. I have offered workshops to my colleagues on working with couples regarding their financial disagreements. Money issues are often concretely about money, but sometimes, they’re about other things. I am delighted when I help individuals and couples become more comfortable with their finances and the “other things” that impact their money issues. As couples resolve their financial issues, they usually feel closer on other levels as well.
“Our work is interactive and involves creative problem-solving, mini-experiments, and occasional homework.”
Interested in speaking with Ella?