Ford "Shay" Jones profile picture

Ford "Shay" Jones Psychotherapy, LPC

Not Taking New Clients

Shay Jones is a fan of keeping things "simple”; it is not only his style but the name of his practice. He puts you at ease and makes you feel comfortable during the process of opening up. He's willing to share aspects of his storied life if it helps your work progress. His firm yet agreeable style allows you to safely explore the dynamics that have landed you in his practice.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Addiction and Substance Misuse
  • Bipolar Disorder
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Texas
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Provider
Profile
“Not a session goes by where I don't add a small nugget of my life experience from my first career; those early years taught me a lot about taking care of others and myself.”
What was your path to becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor?
Being a therapist is a second career for me; my first was producing concerts, private events, and large music festivals. After arriving in Austin, Texas in 1995 at the age of 25, I began managing venues with my childhood friend. We rose quickly in the industry and, by 2000, were producing mass gatherings for the city of Austin and Lance Armstrong. Our crowning achievement, and the source of my demise, was creating the Austin City Limits Music Festival. My unchecked bipolar disorder, substance use, and chronic illness culminated with me exiting the manic industry and landing in a California rehab in 2007. It saved my life and introduced me to my second career. I’d earned an undergraduate degree in 1992, so I took that and my piqued interest in self-growth to St. Edward's University and graduated with a master’s in counseling in 2011. Not a session goes by where I don't add a small nugget of my life experience from my first career; those early years taught me a lot about taking care of others and myself.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am pretty relaxed when it comes to the intake: You find me somehow and we coordinate a time to complete a free consultation by phone, virtually, or via an office visit. If that goes well, we set up the first session. You complete the onboarding process (yippee!) and away we go. I explore your family of origin in detail within the first three sessions. That helps orient me to your worldview and life orientation. I help my clients get started on a basic (five minutes per day) meditation practice; they will develop their meditation practice in their own time but we will discuss it in each session. I follow the existentialism model and help my clients see their lives through a biopsychosocial lens. I’m not a huge homework guy, but I do suggest certain articles, videos, books, and other sources of insight, depending on where the client is in their work.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My belief in being patient with yourself and others plays a big part in my approach to this work; setting aside emotions like shame and guilt allows a person to truly explore why they continue to make the choices they do. Understanding the role of fear in one's life is also paramount. The concept of "fear management" is almost comical to me; I believe that we are simply doing the best we can given the light we are working with. More awareness leads to more light and more light leads to a better understanding of the role that fear plays in our day-to-day lives. This includes fears like being afraid you don’t matter, being afraid you’ll be found out, being afraid you’re not good enough, being afraid you’re not lovable, and many more.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am very excited to see how the use of certain chemicals, drugs, and plant medicine (whatever you want to call it) will play a role in mental health management going forward. I have personally benefited from my use of these agents in the successful care of my own mental health and pursuit of expanded self-awareness. I don't shy away from the topic; I seek it out. To be specific, I have benefitted from the use of ketamine and psilocybin. I also participate in helping my clients find safe, legal, and effective ways of exploring these helpful agents. Ask me whatever you like about the topic. Our culture is FINALLY getting closer to embracing these substances instead of fruitless demonization.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
Yes, I stay up-to-date on the research around the use of ketamine, MDMA, and psilocybin in the treatment of mental health issues.
“My belief in being patient with yourself and others plays a big part in my approach to this work; setting aside emotions like shame and guilt allows a person to truly explore why they continue to make the choices they do.”