Frank Banister, LCSW
Frank Banister profile picture

Frank Banister

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Frank Banister is a social worker with training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy from the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy. His practice focuses on dealing with trauma and promoting growth. Frank works primarily with young adults who are exploring relationships and careers, as well as seniors who are reimagining their lives after retirement.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Relationship Issues
Trauma & PTSD
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Medicare
Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
Oscar
Accepts Out-of-Network
Cash
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Provider
Profile
“Our goal in therapy is to understand your thoughts and feelings to help you gain more control over your life.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I started my career as a therapist shortly after college and practiced for 15 years before leaving the field to go into business. After owning a manufacturing business for a number of years, I returned to providing therapy. I’ve been back in the field for the last five years with a new perspective and more comfort with the ambiguity of therapeutic work.
What should someone know about working with you?
My years in practice and in the world have taught me that therapy is a journey shared by both the therapist and the client. The key to success is an active curiosity, careful listening, a nonjudgmental attitude, and a safe environment based on mutual respect. Our goal in therapy is to understand your thoughts and feelings to help you gain more control over your life. We will identify and work through any issues that stand in the way of you fulfilling your dreams.
Frank Banister photo 1
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Once we reach adulthood, having someone who will just listen to us as we talk about what we are feeling is a rare opportunity—but putting those feelings into words brings clarity and understanding. If you have the desire to try therapy, you should reward yourself with the opportunity. It’s the chance to take time just for yourself.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
There have been many changes since I first began my work in the field. Behavioral health has become more accessible through insurance coverage, but as a result, therapy is often viewed in the medical model of diagnosis and treatment. I am hopeful that we can increasingly accept that psychodynamic psychotherapy isn’t only a way to alleviate symptoms, but that it’s also an important modality for promoting growth and self-awareness even after symptoms improve.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I frequently read the literature on neuropsychology and trauma. Most recently, I’ve been reading the works of Mark Solms and Antonio Damasio—experts on the cutting edge of the mind-body connection. I am very interested in how “talk therapy” or human connection can affect our emotions and even the chemistry of our brains.
“Once we reach adulthood, having someone who will just listen to us as we talk about what we are feeling is a rare opportunity—but putting those feelings into words brings clarity and understanding.”
Interested in speaking with Frank?