Hannah Colbert profile picture

Hannah Colbert

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Hannah Colbert’s practice is eclectic but she draws from dialectical behavior therapy. It is her intent to explore the noble intentions behind the how and why of actions and learn a better, more balanced way to deal with life's challenges. She meets you where you are emotionally, listening to where you want to be and working collaboratively with you to get there.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Anxiety and Panic Disorders
Depression
General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Personality Disorders
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
UMR
Oscar
UHC Student Resources
Harvard Pilgrim
Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
New York
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I continue to draw heavily on DBT with a focus on mindfulness, acceptance, and skill building.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I'm not just a therapist; I am human! I have been hurt, felt regret, and wished I was a better person. But I have also experienced beauty, contentment, and joy. The world is complicated, people are complex, and our problems can be intense. My experiences with this duality made me the therapist I am, able to understand the strength and the limitations within us and to explore with honesty and care a better way for us to find stability. I began my career as a therapist working with families who have been impacted by the criminal justice system. I went on to work for a number of years with individuals and families processing through generational abuse and trauma. Because of my work with this population, I became certified in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), bringing a fresh perspective to clients who experience overwhelming negative emotions in harsh and invalidating environments. I continue to draw heavily on DBT with a focus on mindfulness, acceptance, and skill building.
What should someone know about working with you?
The intake process is designed to better understand your history, goals, and motivations for therapy. I want this to be a great experience for you, so it is important to really understand what you want and the plan to get there. I tailor my therapeutic approach to every individual, which means progress can look different for everyone depending on the stated goals. Every three months, we will assess what has been working, what needs to get better, and what you think your progress has been. Honesty in the therapeutic relationship is essential for progress and I don't just mean on my part. Of course, I want to gently challenge how you have been doing things or thinking about things in order to facilitate change but my hope is that you get to a place where you feel empowered to speak your feelings if you feel hurt, angry, or frustrated.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I continue to read skill training manuals, participate in webinars, attend supervision, and read books pertaining to different therapeutic techniques. Most recently, I attended a training about attachment and abandonment. I also go to therapy, which I believe is essential for growth. I will never be done learning.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
I truly believe that the goodness and morality of a society is measured by how we treat our most vulnerable members. We are all connected to one another and our lives touch in some inextricable way. I have great respect for people, their stories, their struggles, and the paths they find themselves on.
“Of course, I want to gently challenge how you have been doing things or thinking about things in order to facilitate change but my hope is that you get to a place where you feel empowered to speak your feelings if you feel hurt, angry, or frustrated.”