Ida Hammer profile picture

Ida Hammer Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Ida Hammer is an LGBTQ-affirming online therapist experienced in working with women, LGBQ, and transgender and gender nonbinary people. She takes a compassion-focused approach to helping people overcome issues related to anxiety, depression, shame, and low self-worth. Ida is especially interested in supporting the needs and wellbeing of activists and caring professionals.

Ida Hammer is an LGBTQ-affirming online therapist experienced in working with women, LGBQ, and transgender and gender nonbinary people. She takes a compassion-focused approach to helping people overcome issues related to anxiety, depression, shame, …

Ida Hammer is an LGBTQ-affirming online therapist experienced in working with women, LGBQ, and transgender and gender nonbinary people. She takes a compassion-focused approach to helping people overcome issues related to anxiety, depression, shame, and low self-worth. Ida is especially interested in supporting the needs and wellbeing of activists and caring professionals.

Specialties
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • LGBTQIA+
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Meritain
  • Nippon
  • United Healthcare Shared Services
  • Allied Benefit Systems - Aetna
  • Surest (Formerly Bind)
  • Health Plans Inc.
  • UnitedHealthcare Global
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • California
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Through my personal experience and my experience working with others in the TGNB community, I started on a path to become a clinical social worker with the goal of continuing my work to promote the rights and well-being of TGNB people.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Prior to becoming a therapist, I worked with transgender health and civil rights organizations as a volunteer and community organizer. During this time, I also struggled with accessing healthcare and getting employment as a transgender person. Through my personal experience and my experience working with others in the TGNB community, I started on a path to become a clinical social worker with the goal of continuing my work to promote the rights and well-being of TGNB people.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am deeply committed to helping others access gender-affirming care. I know that gender-affirming surgical procedures are medically necessary, life-saving care for those who seek them. I understand that those who come to me for letters are experts on their own gender identities and their experiences of gender dysphoria and that they know what treatments will best affirm their gender while addressing their dysphoria.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
My guiding values are compassion, healing, and liberation. These three values bolster my belief in gender self-determination and are why providing letters supporting access to gender-affirming surgeries is such an important part of my work. Gender-affirming medical care is not only compassionate care that addresses the suffering of gender dysphoria and promotes healing, but it also promotes liberation by supporting people to more fully be themselves.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Decades ago, being transgender was considered a mental illness, and being gender nonbinary wasn’t even recognized as a gender identity. Today, every professional mental health association recognizes that assigned sex and gender identity are not synonymous, that everyone has a gender identity, and that having a gender identity that differs from one’s assigned sex is not disordered or an illness. Furthermore, we as professionals ought to do what is best to support the well-being of TGNB people, including assisting them in accessing medically necessary care that affirms their gender and addresses dysphoria.
“Gender-affirming medical care is not only compassionate care that addresses the suffering of gender dysphoria and promotes healing, but it also promotes liberation by supporting people to more fully be themselves.”