Jamie Lynn Estrada profile picture

Jamie Lynn Estrada Psychotherapy, LMFT

Jamie Lynn offers you the opportunity to view your circumstances and experiences from a wider lens that will help you gain a different perspective so that you are able to make healthier decisions for your life. Jamie Lynn specializes in working with military members and first responders and their families as well as individuals, couples, and families from all walks of life.

Jamie Lynn offers you the opportunity to view your circumstances and experiences from a wider lens that will help you gain a different perspective so that you are able to make healthier decisions for your life. Jamie Lynn specializes in working with…

Jamie Lynn offers you the opportunity to view your circumstances and experiences from a wider lens that will help you gain a different perspective so that you are able to make healthier decisions for your life. Jamie Lynn specializes in working with military members and first responders and their families as well as individuals, couples, and families from all walks of life.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Harvard Pilgrim
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
  • Texas
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Provider
Profile
“Working in a crisis hospital, psychiatric offices, school settings, and private practice with military members and first responders has allowed me to have a better understanding of how we are truly maintaining our family struggles despite our best attempts to heal them.”
What was your path to becoming a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist?
I became a marriage and family therapist because I began to see a need. I felt that the individual seeking counseling and therapy was important, but I was seeing people who seemed to be healthy on the outside yet unable to have healthy relationships with their family members and friends. So, I began to learn how to help heal the relationships within the family. The truth is that we are all contributing to our family by helping, hurting, or maintaining the family struggles. Most of the time, we do not realize the true role that we are playing until we identify our behaviors from another perspective. Working in a crisis hospital, psychiatric offices, school settings, and private practice with military members and first responders has allowed me to have a better understanding of how we are truly maintaining our family struggles despite our best attempts to heal them. After all, hurt people hurt people.
What should someone know about working with you?
The intake process involves a short questionnaire that enables me to get an idea of what is going on, but the relationship we build is most important to experiencing progress. I think it is important to lift the mask and unveil our true selves; the more honest you are with yourself, the more healing you will be able to experience from the inside out. You can expect honesty and a nonjudgmental approach from me. I believe that reflection is the key to experiencing growth and, because of this, weekly tasks are assigned for processing and reflection.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
As a military spouse, I have experienced individuals and families from all walks of life. Families can be torn apart due to an individual's own hurt and pain that they bring to the table and then expect the other person, or the relationship, to fix, which can cause damage that we may not be aware of until it is too late. I have found that working in the present while reflecting on the past is very beneficial, not only for military members and first responders and their families but for everyone. While we are not looking to cast blame or find a right or wrong, I believe it is important to reflect and process our past so that we can now be aware and identify when we are beginning to continue or repeat negative cycles. We cannot do better or healthier until we know better, so let us identify those events, behaviors, and circumstances that have shaped our lives and mold them so that we can use them as good to create the lives we truly want. It is possible and there is a way.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Telehealth has allowed individuals to reach out from their place of comfort. I do not believe that anybody truly wants to be alone and feel lonely, so I am excited about the evolving mental health landscape and being able to connect with others who may not have reached out otherwise. Telehealth offers the capability of creating and expanding the therapeutic workspace.
“We cannot do better or healthier until we know better, so let us identify those events, behaviors, and circumstances that have shaped our lives and mold them so that we can use them as good to create the lives we truly want.”