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Jamie Silverberg Psychotherapy, PsyD, LP

Not Taking New Clients

Jamie Silverberg believes therapy is a unique and personalized collaboration. She aims to create a safe, supportive environment where we can explore your strengths, your values, and your vulnerabilities. She wants therapy to be a place where you feel heard and understood while encouraged and challenged to explore patterns of thinking or behaviors that are no longer serving you.

Specialties
  • Depression
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Personality Disorders
  • Schizophrenia & Psychotic Disorders
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Meritain
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Connecticut
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I was touched and humbled by the stories I was hearing and felt privileged to play a small role in someone’s journey to recovery.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Ever since I was a child, I’ve always been curious about human behavior. I wanted to know why people act the way they do and how their thoughts and feelings impact the way they process events and the way they behave in the moment. As my curiosity grew stronger, I began to reflect on my thoughts and behaviors and explore my own strengths and resilience. I knew I wanted to help people find themselves, but I just didn’t know how. Fast forward to after college, I started working in a psychiatric unit of a hospital. It’s one thing to read about mental illness in a textbook; it’s another to hear and see someone’s lived experience. I was touched and humbled by the stories I was hearing and felt privileged to play a small role in someone’s journey to recovery. I suddenly knew that I wanted to be a psychologist; I wanted to help people navigate life’s toughest moments, normalize mental illness and help fight the stigma associated with it, and help others accept, understand, and cope with lifelong illness.
What should someone know about working with you?
I have trained in community mental health, state hospitals, acute inpatient hospitals, veterans affairs medical centers, and outpatient clinics. I have specialized training in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), solution-focused brief therapy, illness recovery and management, social skills training, and motivational interviewing. To me, therapy is a collaborative process where we work as a team to meet your goals. I believe mental health is on a spectrum and we all have good days and bad days; it’s how we cope with those days that matters most.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I believe in combining science with lived experience. You are the expert of you and I aim to combine my expertise with your expertise to help you improve the quality of your life. In doing so, I bring evidence-based practices and techniques to therapy. This means I routinely attend psychology conferences, stay up-to-date with research, and read peer-reviewed academic journals. I collaborate with community psychiatrists, am well versed in medication management, and have affiliations with nearby hospitals and professional organizations including the American Psychological Association, the Society for the Exploration of Psychotherapy Integration, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness, to name a few. I look forward to hearing from you!
“I suddenly knew that I wanted to be a psychologist; I wanted to help people navigate life’s toughest moments, normalize mental illness and help fight the stigma associated with it, and help others accept, understand, and cope with lifelong illness.”