Jana Brass profile picture

Jana Brass Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Jana Brass has worked in the field of human behavior for over 20 years, primarily with teens and adults. She works from a philosophy that is nonjudgmental and open to all. With empathy and curiosity, she offers space that feels safe to disclose feelings or behaviors that seem scary or unacceptable in an effort to promote healing, optimal functioning, and self-acceptance.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Women’s Mental Health
  • Addiction and Substance Misuse
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I am a warm, insightful, and highly intuitive individual who is able to make what seems like an intimidating process comfortable and disarming.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My path to becoming a therapist has certainly not been linear. Due to various personal issues, I initially put off the conventional college path, choosing to work odd jobs, travel, and pursue my love of music. These travels cemented my fascination with the diverse human experience and inspired me to pursue the college track in my late 20s to study human behavior in an academic setting. After studying sociology and psychology in my undergraduate program, I originally pursued a career in academic research, studying addiction and psychoactive substances and their effects at Columbia Medical School and the Rockefeller Institute from 2002-2006. While this experience provided immeasurable value to my learning and understanding of certain human concepts, I learned that my true interest lay in the clinical understanding of humans on a more personal, therapeutic basis as opposed to in the sterile confines of a lab. This informed my graduate school path and various job settings.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am a warm, insightful, and highly intuitive individual who is able to make what seems like an intimidating process comfortable and disarming. My primary focus is on the therapeutic alliance or trusted relationship as that is the platform from which any vulnerable, real self-work emerges. From there, I use a variety of evidence-based approaches depending on the unique needs and response system of each individual. No person is the same nor does one treatment plan look the same. Please note: I know it can be overwhelming to read so many profiles that sound similar and not know the right fit. I can assure you that I am not just looking to fill slots; I am also interested in working with the right fit. With that said, I make an effort to consistently check that the connection is working and if it’s not, I promise to either change treatment approaches or even offer to help find a better fit as I want this experience to be meaningful and effective for both of us.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am most excited about new platforms from which to engage in the therapeutic process. I am interested in ways to bring physical movement to the experience of change. With that said, I am hoping to eventually incorporate walking sessions into my practice as I believe in the evidence-based research that connects physical movement to brain stimulation and openness. I find that my deepest insights can be reached when taking long walks, as motion can awaken and open the mind in ways that sitting in a room cannot.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
As I mentioned above, I have done extensive research related to the human condition, drivers of human behavior, and the reward response system in the brain, work that also allowed for the opportunity to get published in several academic publications. This work not only led to a deeper understanding of the brain and human motivation but it also provided illumination around systemic oppression and how funded research can inform drug laws that disproportionately oppress marginalized populations. My research experience has enriched the critical thought processes I bring to my current practice.
“My primary focus is on the therapeutic alliance or trusted relationship as that is the platform from which any vulnerable, real self-work emerges.”