Jennifer Gutstein profile picture

Jennifer Gutstein Psychotherapy, LCSWR

Not Taking New Clients

Jennifer Gutstein is an experienced, licensed clinical social worker with a psychodynamic orientation and an integrated approach. She uses cognitive behavioral, dialectical behavior, and trauma processing techniques (such as EMDR). She works with adolescents and adults, has a specialty in eating disorders, and works with depression, anxiety, trauma, loss, and relationships.

Specialties
  • Depression
  • Grief and Loss
  • Eating Disorders and Body Image
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Fidelis
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My style is warm and informal; I listen with compassion and kind respect.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I’ve always been struck by the huge role mental and emotional health play in the trajectory of people’s lives and how buttressing this health can create a rich life filled with meaning. Anxiety can stop people from proceeding out of the confines of what they’re comfortable with. Depression and trauma can similarly keep one stuck in the same unrewarding, circumscribed stories. I started with a social work perspective that emphasized support and systems and then sought psychodynamic training that helped me understand the internalization of so many systems and the ways we can free ourselves while recognizing our complex experiences. As I have worked, I have seen the need for specific interventions for trauma and eating disorders. As a result, I learned more about these treatments and continue to invest in training and learning.
What should someone know about working with you?
Initially, I assess your individual needs and how you like to work. Our first session should help you feel comfortable. My style is warm and informal; I listen with compassion and kind respect. I am not a blank slate but speak and provide a safe environment that helps clients address difficult subjects. I understand the distress that can lead one to feel stuck, and I work a great deal with the growth, development, and hope that emerge as we address problematic areas. I work with relationship issues, various stressors, and the challenges of different life stages. Curiosity is key as we try to examine our internal narratives and create new ones. My goal is to help clients grow, make changes they want to make, have a better understanding of their strengths and abilities, and lead more fulfilling lives.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
People are more comfortable talking about mental health, seeking help, and recognizing that therapy can provide strength and new opportunities. They are not alone. The more we understand ourselves, the more we can navigate working with our histories and creating new futures. We can grapple with difficult feelings and events, keeping the lessons and discarding old tropes that no longer fit. I am interested in continuing to work with telehealth and seeing how this burgeoning medium continues to provide more access and flexibility, all while examining ways to make sure I am still connected and present with my clients.
“I understand the distress that can lead one to feel stuck, and I work a great deal with the growth, development, and hope that emerge as we address problematic areas.”