Jonah Mishaan, LMHC
Jonah Mishaan profile picture

Jonah Mishaan

Psychotherapy, LMHC

Jonah Mishaan works with young professionals who are navigating the complexities of anxiety, depression, relationships, substance abuse, and stress during emerging adulthood. He believes that unprocessed trauma is often at the root of negative patterns, such as addiction and self-defeating behaviors, and he helps clients create meaning and gain freedom from these patterns.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Substance Use/Abuse
Trauma & PTSD
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$80-140
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Cigna
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I see therapy as a catalyst of creativity; it’s not only about the elimination of symptoms, but the discovery of a new person who is able to live a life with more meaning, vitality, harmony, and fulfillment.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I chose therapy as a career after personally experiencing it as a means of growth and self-discovery; I’m honored to be able to facilitate this process with my clients. I see therapy as a catalyst of creativity; it’s not only about the elimination of symptoms, but the discovery of a new person who is able to live a life with more meaning, vitality, harmony, and fulfillment. I enjoy working with a broad range of clients, and often work with those experiencing life-transitions, such as relationship changes, loss and grief, emerging young adulthood, and career shifts. I have additional training in addictions counseling (CASAC) as well as trauma work (CCTP) and one of my interests is in the interplay between addiction and trauma.
What should someone know about working with you?
I dedicate at least the first two sessions to making an assessment and trying to obtain a history as complete as possible. I take that time to make the determination of whether we are a good fit and I encourage clients to do the same. I focus my sessions on increasing awareness of negative and self-defeating patterns and opening up new opportunities for living. I favor more of an insight-oriented approach, but I do find that utilizing certain skills enhances therapy in many situations. I believe in meeting clients where they are and adjusting my own expectations accordingly. I value the therapeutic relationship, both as a way to gauge the work that we’re doing and as means of understanding more about patterns and relationships in my client’s life.
Jonah Mishaan photo 1
How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
I find it important to include other professionals in treatment when needed. In the past, I’ve collaborated with psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, medical professionals, addictions facilities, and previous therapists. If medications are needed, I am able to make referrals and work with the prescriber. I work with an experienced supervisor, receiving feedback on my cases and work. Having another perspective and voice is something I believe to be essential for a therapist at any stage in their career. If my client or I feel that we are not the right fit, I will refer to other providers whenever necessary.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Starting therapy can feel intimidating; it isn’t exactly natural for most people to reveal their intimate thoughts and feelings to a stranger. I understand that and respect that a relationship takes time to develop and unfold. So, give it a shot! There’s no commitment - if you feel like it’s not the right fit with your therapist, there are other alternatives out there. It often takes many people a few tries with different therapists before they find someone that they click with. But, when you do, it can be one of the most valuable experiences and relationships that you will have in your life.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I’m most excited about the prospect of therapy becoming more widespread and accessible. In addition to the changing cultural perspectives surrounding mental health, the prevalence and acceptance of telehealth therapy is something which I believe can have a significant impact. I’m hoping that teletherapy can open up treatment to many who may have been too nervous, intimidated, or busy to commit to traditional sessions. Though it’s not quite the same experience as meeting in person, if it provides access to a whole new group who otherwise would not be in treatment, the tradeoff is well worth it.
“I enjoy working with a broad range of clients, and often work with those experiencing life-transitions, such as relationship changes, loss and grief, emerging young adulthood, and career shifts.”
Interested in speaking with Jonah?