Jose Mestre profile picture

Jose Mestre Psychotherapy, LCSW

Jose Mestre uses practices that have been proven to work, including breathwork, mindfulness, and meditation. He helps individuals, couples, families, and teens learn new insights and new coping skills to build greater self-awareness and self-empowerment. He helps those feeling overwhelmed with sadness, anxiety, stress, and self-esteem issues.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Starting from the issues the client wants to focus on, we work collaboratively so the client learns new insights and coping skills and is better able to communicate, feel more confident, grow calmer, become happier, and accomplish their goals in life.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
After the tragic events of 9/11, I co-founded a nonprofit to bring holistic healing modalities to the people affected. Because there was such a need to help people not only physically but emotionally, we organized peer counseling supervised by a psychiatrist. Wanting to learn new skills, I went to graduate school in middle age to become a psychotherapist. I am a Latino immigrant and passionate about social justice. After graduation, I worked with people of color, immigrants, and other disadvantaged and marginalized populations. I saw more and more in my work how much people's challenges were based on lack of self-esteem and communication issues, which led to difficult or failed relationships with partners, family members, friends, or coworkers. Because of this, I did two years of postgraduate work at the Ackerman Institute for the Family, one of the best institutes in the country for family and couples therapy.
What should someone know about working with you?
I use the first sessions to explore with the client their upbringing, their family and relationship dynamics, their communication styles, and how they handle conflict. Starting from the issues the client wants to focus on, we work collaboratively so the client learns new insights and coping skills and is better able to communicate, feel more confident, grow calmer, become happier, and accomplish their goals in life. Therapy is not forever, and once the client learns how to practice skills in a consistent way for an agreed-upon period, we start the winding down process and end when the client wishes or we jointly agree that therapy has accomplished the client's goals. I like working with individuals, couples, families, and teens who want to learn new skills to help them better cope with and overcome stress, anxiety, depression, and self-esteem issues while taking self-responsibility and learning how to communicate better in each of their relationships.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I am a Latino refugee and immigrant and saw in my upbringing how trauma affects immigrant families, which gave me a passion for social justice. I also saw how stress and depression can create dysfunction that stunts communication and leads to self-esteem and self-responsibility issues.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I have been doing breathwork and meditation for 40 years with great results in helping me with stress, mood, and anxiety. I did my master's thesis on breathwork and meditation as therapeutic healing modalities. In my research, I saw there existed many evidence-based studies published in peer-reviewed journals that validated my experience and that of the hundreds of people I have known who have had similar results. These studies show that breathwork and meditation have tremendous benefits to anxiety, depression, and stress, but they have also shown great results in populations suffering from severe trauma, including victims of war, terrorism, manmade and natural disasters, physical and sexual assault, and incarceration. I have firsthand experience in the efficacy of these studies from my extensive work with the 9/11 community, veterans, active-duty personnel, refugees, people affected by the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and those affected by Hurricane Sandy.
What did you learn in your studies that has helped inform your practice the most?
I was asked this question a lot in job interviews after graduating. My answer is that I am motivated by my work with the 9/11 community. I went back to school in middle age to get my master’s and become a therapist. I loved the material I learned, my teachers, and especially how smart, dedicated, and personable my classmates were, many of whom have become lifelong friends. Even with my great experience in grad school, what has prepared me the most to be a psychotherapist has been a lifetime of working on myself to be a good listener, empathetic, nonjudgmental, warm, and caring in a world that is full of criticism and often soul-crushing. I acknowledge, praise, and support others.
“I am a Latino refugee and immigrant and saw in my upbringing how trauma affects immigrant families, which gave me a passion for social justice.”
Interested in speaking with Jose?