Julie Kipp, PhD LCSW
Julie Kipp profile picture

Julie Kipp

Psychotherapy, PhD, LCSW

Julie Kipp is a social worker with 30 years of experience in private practice and agency work. She is committed to helping those with anxiety, depression, trauma, or psychosis as well as the family members of people with mental and physical disabilities. Before going into social work, she was a visual artist and she loves working with creative people and their challenges.
Specialties
General Mental Health
General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Addiction and Substance Misuse
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Medicare
Oscar
UHC Student Resources
Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
New York
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“During my years in the field, I have developed different approaches to helping my clients, but the basis for all my work is an appreciation of the unique challenges and strengths of each person, which are understood through a psychodynamic lens.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My first career was as a visual artist, but a personal crisis led me to seek therapy (something foreign to the midwestern culture I grew up in). Psychotherapy truly changed my life! My wonderful therapist got me through a crisis and inspired me to want to help people as I had been helped. I went back to school to get a master’s in social work and a PhD, all while working in a New York City social services agency and helping people recover from mental illness. I have also had a private practice throughout the years and worked with a variety of people and issues.
What should someone know about working with you?
During my years in the field, I have developed different approaches to helping my clients, but the basis for all my work is an appreciation of the unique challenges and strengths of each person, which are understood through a psychodynamic lens. This means that we work to understand how life experience and even the life experience of parents and grandparents may contribute to both productive and less productive habits of coping. Progress is measured according to the client's own goals.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
My doctoral dissertation explored treatments that are conducted in communities. It made me aware of the importance of each person as an individual in a network of people. Family, social, and religious influences support and challenge us.
“This means that we work to understand how life experience and even the life experience of parents and grandparents may contribute to both productive and less productive habits of coping.”
Interested in speaking with Julie?