Justine Fulton profile picture

Justine Fulton Psychotherapy, PsyD

Dr. Justine Fulton is a licensed clinical psychologist and certified school psychologist. She works with individuals and families across the lifespan who are experiencing anxiety and depression. Dr. Fulton also offers personality, intellectual, autism, ADHD, and educational assessment services.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Parenting
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • Medicare
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • 1199
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
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Provider
Profile
“I often work from an ACT perspective, which includes a large values component.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My training experiences have provided me invaluable opportunities to work with a range of individuals from different backgrounds across the lifespan in a variety of contexts. My training at Kean Psychological Services, in several New Jersey school districts, and at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has shaped my clinical interests and consequently, my interest in pursuing a career in private practice. I've always loved working with different people, learning about their backgrounds, and trying to understand their perspectives. I enjoy being able to sit with someone and learn about them, listen, and reflect. As a psychologist, I get to do this alongside the person sitting across from me. Being a therapist means getting to work collaboratively with people.
What should someone know about working with you?
Typically, the intake process is a time where we review informed consent, including confidentiality, HIPAA, practice policies, and more. It is also the time to start collecting information about the client’s circumstances, including their past and present symptoms and their history related to social relationships, work, family, school, and more. Particular areas of focus for conceptualization include the following: Impairment; a timeline of onset and/or episodes of symptomatology; patterns of thoughts, behaviors, and feelings (as well as their functions); reinforcing variables; and the interaction among all these different elements. Goals are also developed. I tell everyone who comes to my practice that it is important to remember you're the expert on you and without your cooperation, we will not get anywhere. Questionnaires are often provided to track progress in therapy. Homework is assigned as well.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I often work from an ACT perspective, which includes a large values component. My set of values related to relationships and work are very clear: I want to be a therapist who embodies the values of honesty, kindness, trust, communication, and knowledge.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
At first, I did not like telehealth, but I now prefer it. In order to promote positive growth and progress in behavioral health, it is important to have communication, follow-through, and most of all, consistency. Telehealth offers flexibility and convenience, allowing more consistency in seeing clients week to week. I'm seeing significantly more progress with many clients because of telehealth.
“My set of values related to relationships and work are very clear: I want to be a therapist who embodies the values of honesty, kindness, trust, communication, and knowledge.”
Interested in speaking with Justine?