Kate Mercurio profile picture

Kate Mercurio Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Kate Mercurio is a psychotherapist who specializes in treating anxiety and depression. With a warm, collaborative style, Kate partners with her clients to gain deeper insight into the source of their struggles, to challenge unhealthy patterns, and to find more effective ways of thinking and behaving.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“In addition to the historical work, I utilize cognitive behavioral strategies, mindfulness techniques, and (when appropriate) creative interventions.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I became a therapist later than most. My first career was in musical theater, an art form I loved but a business that chiseled away at my self-esteem. With the help of a wonderful therapist, I realized that clinging to that path was making me unhappy. So, I pivoted into the nonprofit sector, fundraising for teen programs. From there, I learned that I wanted to have a deeper one-to-one impact, which led me to social work. Each of these transitions was a challenge, and therapy helped me transform pain and stuckness into healing and growth. This is what I aim to do with my clients. Prior to opening my own practice, my clinical experience has been in community mental health and college counseling. I work with adults, and I have a particular fondness for working with college students, parents, and artists. In addition to anxiety and depression, I have experience working with trauma, grief and loss, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, LGBTQ issues, and gender dysphoria.
What should someone know about working with you?
In our early sessions, I will ask questions and listen carefully without judgment as you teach me about your life. Through this process, we will develop a deeper shared understanding of you and how your experiences have shaped the way you feel about yourself. We will build trust and hope, both of which are essential for moving forward into the good but hard work of psychotherapy. Positive change evolves out of understanding how past events (or even just our own unquestioned assumptions) keep us repeating unhelpful patterns. My job is to illuminate these connections and help you find new ways of thinking and behaving that will better serve you and your life. In addition to the historical work, I utilize cognitive behavioral strategies, mindfulness techniques, and (when appropriate) creative interventions. Most importantly, I bring myself to engage in an honest and caring process with you as you work to create the life you want to live and to become the person you want to be.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
My core values of authenticity, compassion, and respect inform every aspect of my personal and professional life. From the way I engage with clients to how I teach my toddlers to interact with each other and the world, I live these values day in and day out. Additionally, I work hard to practice cultural humility, a lifelong process of learning, increasing self-awareness, and engaging in self-reflection. I am a straight, white, cisgender female as well as an artist, a career-changer, a wife, and a mother. While my identity affects how I view and understand the world, I cherish opportunities to work with individuals whose backgrounds and experiences differ from my own.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Teletherapy is exciting because it removes a variety of barriers, increasing access to a wider range of people. It allows clients to fit therapy into their lives in new ways, and to reach more providers than ever before. While I miss being in the same room with my clients, I appreciate the powerful impact that this new level of accessibility will have.
What do you find most fulfilling in your work as a therapist?
In therapy (as in life), the journey is as important as the destination. It is the process of joining another person on their journey that I find most fulfilling about my work. I feel privileged to sit with each and every client, to bear witness to their experiences, and to help them move forward with a greater sense of calm, clarity, and self-acceptance.
“Most importantly, I bring myself to engage in an honest and caring process with you as you work to create the life you want to live and to become the person you want to be.”