Katie DiMuzio, LCSW
Katie DiMuzio profile picture

Katie DiMuzio

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Katie DiMuzio has a passion for supporting highly motivated individuals with anxiety, perfectionism, career concerns, relationship issues, and trauma. She focuses on helping her clients identify strengths, recognize and alter unhelpful thoughts and behavior patterns, and manage difficult emotions to reduce stress, gain insight, and increase life satisfaction.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Trauma & PTSD
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“Though you may begin therapy feeling low or nervous, I aim to remind you of the resilience and skills you already possess, while helping you discover new ways to look at and tackle obstacles.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I’ve always had a passion for helping others, but I was at a loss for how to do so in my career. Then, in my mid-20s, I experienced a personal tragedy and needed space to sort myself out. Therapy allowed me to speak freely and without fear of judgment about my fears and sadness, as well as my uncertainty about the future. I learned a lot about myself, my family, and my own patterns, which allowed me to make better decisions for my life and career. As I went through the process, I realized that being a therapist would allow me to support others while also tapping into my natural strengths and interests. I hope to give to my clients what I received from therapy: safety, resilience, and clarity about what may be holding you back so you can move forward.
What should someone know about working with you?
My approach is collaborative and interactive. I tend to begin therapy by providing information and education about different techniques we may use and why they may be helpful for your concerns. I also start from a place of strength—though you may begin therapy feeling low or nervous, I aim to remind you of the resilience and skills you already possess, while helping you discover new ways to look at and tackle obstacles. I’m a fan of homework handouts and may encourage you to do practice exercises between sessions to work on the skills you’re learning.
Katie DiMuzio photo 1
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
If you sense that therapy could be helpful, or your inner voice is telling you that something in your life isn’t working, listen to that. Therapy can help you work out what is going on and gain clarity, so you can move forward from whatever is in the way. Also, if you contact a therapist and it doesn’t feel like a good fit, honor that. The most important thing is to feel connection and trust, so if you don’t feel comfortable with the first person you find, try again—chances are, there is a great provider out there for you. Therapy doesn’t have to be a lifelong commitment either—sometimes a few months of hard work may be enough to help you feel more confident or stable.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Teletherapy! My practice is completely online and I find this works well for many people who want to attempt therapy but struggle with the logistics. There can be barriers to traditional, in-office therapy, including location accessibility (finding a therapist near your home or office), lack of convenient appointment times, and privacy concerns (running into others in the waiting room). With online therapy, clients can meet with their therapists from the comfort of their home or office and don’t need to worry about adding extra travel time or expenses. Many clients report feeling more comfortable sitting on their own couches and opening up than they do in a therapy office. (Bonus: If you have a pet, they can stay by your side on your therapy journey!)
How can you tell if teletherapy is a good fit for you?
Teletherapy (also referred to as online, virtual, or remote therapy) can be a great option for many people, but there are some things to consider about whether it’s the right one for you. For example, if your main reason for seeking help is due to alcohol or drug addiction, or if you struggle with a severe eating disorder, in-person treatment might be more effective—especially if you are just starting therapy. In terms of practical considerations, teletherapy requires that you have a private place to meet for your sessions—where you can be alone without interruptions for an extended period of time—and is reliant on strong internet connection.
“With online therapy, clients can meet with their therapists from the comfort of their home or office and don’t need to worry about adding extra travel time or expenses.”