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Kingsley Grant Psychotherapy, LMFT

Kingsley Grant makes your mental, emotional, and relational wellbeing a priority and helps you find solutions, gain clarity, and experience peace.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • Parenting
  • Religion and Spirituality
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
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Provider
Profile
“I personally advocate for finding solutions to the problems being faced rather than trying to look for causes of the problem.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Becoming a therapist is something that came about through a series of twists and turns; it wasn't what I had set out to do. When I tell people that my undergrad work was in computer science, there is this weird look or moment where an attempt is made to connect the dots. They wonder, “How do you go from computer science to therapist work?” This question intrigues a number of people, but it's an easy answer for me. Both careers require logic and reasoning, yet I find more fulfillment working with people, helping them navigate challenges and coming up with solutions. So, it made sense to broaden my skills to do that; I pursued my master’s in psychotherapy (namely, marriage and family therapy). And, voila! Here I am.
What should someone know about working with you?
My intake process involves getting background information that gives me enough information to get started. Once that has been established, I focus on building rapport with my clients….and then the work begins. I personally advocate for finding solutions to the problems being faced rather than trying to look for causes of the problem. Yes, it’s important to have an idea of causation but at the end of the day, knowing what caused a problem doesn’t fix a problem. What fixes a problem is finding a solution and putting the work in to achieve your goal. The two approaches I use most often are cognitive behavioral therapy and solution-focused brief therapy.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
To meet the state's requirements, I've continued taking CEUs. This allows me to receive updated information on many of the approaches that I use in my practice. But I also love to learn, so I continue to develop and hone my skills in human development and behaviors. Because of the work I do with couples and other relationships, some of the competencies I’ve studied are around communication and conflict resolution.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My worldview has been incredibly shaped by my Christian upbringing and the fact that my family was very conservative. My cultural exposure in a third-world country allows me to look through a lens that caters more to the underdog or people who feel oppressed by a system, person, or group. This cultural lens also prepares me to speak to a diverse audience and I find that many of my clients see that as a plus.
“Yes, it’s important to have an idea of causation but at the end of the day, knowing what caused a problem doesn’t fix a problem.”
Interested in speaking with Kingsley?