Laura Ford profile picture

Laura Ford Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Laura Ford is a clinical social worker with an interest in helping adults cope with anxiety and depression arising from transitions, complicated relationships, professional challenges, trauma, and chronic illness. Laura has more than a decade of experience in a variety of settings and aims to help clients manage their symptoms and gain a deeper understanding of themselves.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I believe the quality of the relationship between therapist and client is even more important than the modality of therapy and it is my highest priority to build a warm and nonjudgmental space in which we work collaboratively.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always been drawn to people’s stories and, from a young age, I was told I was an empathic listener. My first career was as a book editor where I helped shape and make meaning of writers’ narratives. Becoming a social worker allowed me to not only bear witness to people’s challenges but also assist them in navigating their problems and feel less alone. In addition to private practice, I’ve worked with clients and their families at a large teaching hospital where I’ve also served as a wellness advisor to staff dealing with the stressors of working in the medical field. This work has demonstrated to me the power a therapeutic relationship can have in providing support and motivating change.
What should someone know about working with you?
I work from a psychodynamic framework and integrate elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness into my approach. I believe the quality of the relationship between therapist and client is even more important than the modality of therapy and it is my highest priority to build a warm and nonjudgmental space in which we work collaboratively. I want feedback from my clients on how therapy is going for them, and I like to implement practical coping strategies in addition to exploring the deeper facets of their identities.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
For me, being a therapist means a commitment to lifelong learning and involves keeping abreast of evidence-based research and honing my technique. I participate in numerous continuing education opportunities, conferences, and training, read a variety of clinical and research-based texts, and receive both individual and peer supervision. I recently attended training in cognitive behavioral therapy and am becoming increasingly invested in learning about how mindfulness can help treat trauma and anxiety.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Treatment is becoming more normalized and accessible. I welcome these changes and am excited to welcome those who may have been previously hesitant to engage in therapy.
“I want feedback from my clients on how therapy is going for them, and I like to implement practical coping strategies in addition to exploring the deeper facets of their identities.”