Long Quach, PsyD
Long Quach profile picture

Long Quach

Psychotherapy, PsyD

Long Quach is a psychologist who helps clients using evidence-based strategies and knowledge. He treats anxiety, depression, and other mental health challenges through interactive and energetic sessions filled with creativity and engagement. He strives to serve as a partner, working together with his clients to get them where they want to go.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders
Relationship Issues
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I am a firm believer in practice and patience. But not just any practice, the kind of practice that leads to growth and expansion.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Like most people, my life was not always easy. But I was lucky enough to have found people along the way who helped me understand myself and how I could live in this chaotic world in the best way possible. Those people helped me see my own strengths and abilities when I couldn’t see them for myself — they helped me find direction when I was lost. All of this led to my appreciation and strong belief in the human relationship and I went into this field as a result. I wanted to be at least one person in someone’s life who could help them recognize their strengths and their potential.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am a firm believer in practice and patience. But not just any practice, the kind of practice that leads to growth and expansion. This means you can expect us to dig deep and dig often. After enough ground has been revealed, we will work together to help you gain insight and see the relational pattern between you and your world. Once we have a clear understanding of you, how you live, and how you want to live, we will practice — at your pace — the skills that are most fitting so that you can continue to grow long after therapy ends.
Long Quach photo 1
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
I come from a culture where therapy is taboo, yet the reasons for this hesitation are more related to fear and lack of knowledge. Once people see a little demonstration of the power of therapy, fear often turns into curiosity. With that said, therapy is not easy; it can be painful and requires a lot of effort and patience. But there’s a lot of learning in therapy, too! Oftentimes, it’s very exciting to learn new skills that can change the way you live. It is also especially exciting when you uncover something new about yourself or those around you.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I wrote my dissertation on burnout. Before I spent many hours learning about it, I tried to find the path to happiness through the flow experience. I wanted to understand why I was frequently tired and unhappy despite living what many would consider to be my “best life.” I realized that while there’s a formula, the formula is unique to each individual. This learning journey helped me and many others I’ve worked with find the formula right for us. While that formula does not get rid of pain or create permanent happiness, it does a good job of helping us live a little easier.
What makes you and the therapy you provide unique?
I wrote my dissertation on burnout. Before I spent many hours learning about it, I tried to find the path to happiness through the flow experience. I wanted to understand why I was frequently tired and unhappy despite living what many would consider to be my “best life.” I realized that while there’s a formula, the formula is unique to each individual. This learning journey helped me and many others I’ve worked with find the right formula. While that formula does not get rid of pain or create permanent happiness, it does a good job of helping us live a little easier.
“I always strive to professionally bring myself into the room so the therapeutic process feels rich and rewarding.”
Interested in speaking with Long?