Malkie Bobker profile picture

Malkie Bobker Psychotherapy, LMHC

Malkie Bobker works with individuals, couples, and families of all backgrounds through a culturally-sensitive and trauma-informed lens. She utilizes an integrative approach to fit your unique needs, combining aspects of relational, person-centered, and mindfulness work, in a safe and accepting space. Her specialty practice is in grief, trauma, and anxiety, with a particular focus in infertility and pregnancy loss.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Women’s Mental Health (Pregnancy, Infertility and Post-Partum)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Your struggles and your journey mean a great deal to me, and I have deep respect for your vulnerability and courage in seeking help.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always been interested in learning about people, and the cyclical relationship between our thoughts, feelings, and our life experiences as they continuously influence each other. The beliefs that we form about ourselves and others often influence the choices we make and how we experience both life’s curveballs and its joys, which in turn influence and reinforce the thoughts, feelings, and beliefs we have about ourselves. Oftentimes without even realizing it or having a clue of how we got there, we wind up stuck in a negative pattern replaying itself, and we cannot seem to get out of it. Observing this tendency moved me to pursue a career in mental health, so that I can provide a safe space for people to start exploring these patterns and help them gain insight and self-awareness. I have had a wide array of clinical experiences, working in a college counseling center, an outpatient clinic, and child welfare, and I developed a passion for helping others who often feel isolated by their various struggles - be it trauma, a painful diagnosis, or relationship challenges - feel heard and supported.
What should someone know about working with you?
First and foremost, I genuinely care. Your struggles and your journey mean a great deal to me, and I have deep respect for your vulnerability and courage in seeking help. In utilizing relational and person-centered approaches, I place a lot of value on the therapeutic relationship as the vehicle for healing. I aim to provide a safe and open space where together, we can explore your past, your relationships, and your current stressors, and develop ways of coping and taking control of your life, taking into account all aspects of your life. I strongly believe that all of your experiences - even the painful ones you wish you never had - make you who you are, and my goal is to help you integrate those experiences so that you find your peace and happiness.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
There really is no end to the learning process. There is always more knowledge to gain or skills to hone. I am passionate about working with people from a trauma-informed lens, which motivates me to read and research as well as take trainings on the topic of trauma and its effect on our minds and bodies.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
The core values that guide me both personally and professionally are honesty, empathy, and compassion. I aim to create a safe space, where you feel understood and accepted, while you learn about yourself. In doing that, my goal is that in experiencing that, you ultimately learn to relate to yourself with the compassion and acceptance you deserve.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Now more than ever, there is increased openness and transparency around the topic of mental health, and there has been much work done to destigmatize subjects that have been off-limits for so long and surrounded by walls of shame. It is a great relief that mental health is starting to be taken as seriously as physical health. This ultimately allows for people to feel less shame about their mental health, which means they may feel more comfortable seeking help and more connected with others in general.
“I strongly believe that all of your experiences - even the painful ones you wish you never had - make you who you are, and my goal is to help you integrate those experiences so that you find your peace and happiness.”
Interested in speaking with Malkie?