Mariko Iwabuchi profile picture

Mariko Iwabuchi Psychotherapy, PhD

Mariko Iwabuchi provides telehealth therapy to young adults and professionals who struggle with stress, anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. She strives to create a warm and safe space in therapy by being collaborative and genuine. She helps clients live more authentically through client-centered, compassion-focused, trauma-informed, and social justice-informed approaches.

Mariko Iwabuchi provides telehealth therapy to young adults and professionals who struggle with stress, anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. She strives to create a warm and safe space in therapy by being collaborative and genuine. She helps cl…

Mariko Iwabuchi provides telehealth therapy to young adults and professionals who struggle with stress, anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. She strives to create a warm and safe space in therapy by being collaborative and genuine. She helps clients live more authentically through client-centered, compassion-focused, trauma-informed, and social justice-informed approaches.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • ADD/ADHD
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Harvard Pilgrim
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • California
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Provider
Profile
“it is important to me to foster a safe and compassionate space for clients so that we can be collaborative in our work together.”
What was your path to becoming a Psychologist?
As a shy, second-generation Japanese American child, I found it difficult to navigate between different cultural spaces. To better cope with the distress of being a multicultural person, I became interested in understanding more about myself and others and the factors that impact psychological wellbeing. My early 20s were dedicated to learning more about psychology and the mental health benefits of dance. During this time, I started to develop a passion for helping others, particularly individuals who may be experiencing life transitions, and wanted to build their self-confidence. It took a few encouraging remarks from mentors and friends to help me realize that a career in clinical psychology is something I wouldn’t regret (and they were absolutely right). This led me to pursue a PhD program in clinical psychology where I focused my training on providing therapy to college populations from a culturally-sensitive, compassion-focused, trauma-informed, and social justice-informed approach.
What should someone know about working with you?
Building a strong working alliance with your therapist is important because it can affect how much you benefit from therapy. Thus, it is important to me to foster a safe and compassionate space for clients so that we can be collaborative in our work together. I try to help clients feel more comfortable in therapy by inviting and welcoming feedback, being genuine in my interactions, holding space for feelings to be felt and expressed, going at their pace, and being open-minded and curious about their experiences. Once rapport is built, I take on more direct approaches, like gently challenging thoughts, assigning activities, and encouraging clients to practice skills between sessions. I currently offer therapy virtually and work primarily with young adults and professionals struggling with a variety of concerns, including anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, and stress. If you are interested in learning more, please feel free to email me to schedule a free 15-minute initial consultation.
“I try to help clients feel more comfortable in therapy by inviting and welcoming feedback, being genuine in my interactions, holding space for feelings to be felt and expressed, going at their pace, and being open-minded and curious about their experiences.”