Marjorie Muravina profile picture

Marjorie Muravina Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Marjorie Muravina is a therapist working with adults and adolescents from diverse backgrounds. She blends cognitive behavioral therapies to treat a range of presenting concerns, including depression, anxiety, trauma, and life transitions. Outside of her private practice, Marjorie is on the family medicine behavioral science faculty at BronxCare Health System.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Grief and Loss
  • Chronic Illness, Pain and Sleep Disorders
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My style combines warmth and acceptance with accountability and an emphasis on progress toward therapeutic goals.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have found myself in the role of confidant and supporter in my personal relationships for as long as I can remember, but I explored other professional paths before becoming a therapist. My decision to pursue this career showed me the transformative power of connecting with sources of meaning and purpose in daily life. I received my Master of Social Work degree from Yeshiva University and completed postgraduate training in a variety of therapeutic modalities, including REBT, DBT, CBT-I, and exposure therapies.
What should someone know about working with you?
My style combines warmth and acceptance with accountability and an emphasis on progress toward therapeutic goals. Most of my work is based in cognitive behavioral therapy; as such, sessions are often focused on building the skills necessary to improve feelings by changing dysfunctional thoughts and behaviors.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Clinicians across disciplines are now paying more attention to the social determinants of mental health. In particular, a spotlight has been shone on the emotional and physical toll of systemic inequality on individuals and communities of color. As we continue to expand access to quality mental health care in the US, I believe it is crucial for therapists to continually unlearn beliefs and practices based on white dominance and learn to become anti-racist in our work.
“Most of my work is based in cognitive behavioral therapy; as such, sessions are often focused on building the skills necessary to improve feelings by changing dysfunctional thoughts and behaviors.”