Mary Bright profile picture

Mary Bright Psychotherapy, LCSW

Mary Bright is a licensed clinical social worker with over 30 years of experience. She has trained with many of the masters in the field and specializes in individual and family therapy with children, adolescents, and adults. Her unique mix of skills enables her clients to find lasting relief from anxiety, depression, stress, anger, relationship struggles, and health issues.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Chronic Illness, Pain and Sleep Disorders
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Parenting
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
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Provider
Profile
“I realized early in my career that traditional talk therapy helped produce insight and understanding into our behaviors but rarely resulted in real and lasting change for clients’ most troubling issues.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I've known since childhood that I wanted to be a therapist. I feel like it is an honor for me that my clients trust me with their struggles, hopes, and fears. I am easy to talk to, compassionate, and down-to-earth. I've made it a priority to learn effective methods for helping my clients heal from past traumas and overcome present challenges. I realized early in my career that traditional talk therapy helped produce insight and understanding into our behaviors but rarely resulted in real and lasting change for clients’ most troubling issues. This led to training in somatic psychotherapy, including a clinical level of meditation that uses the body to heal the mind and the mind to heal the body. Working with clients from all stages of the life cycle has provided valuable insight into how problems are created in childhood, how these issues manifest in our adolescence and adulthood, and how these issues affect us physically and emotionally as we age.
What should someone know about working with you?
After completing a simple one-page intake form, I will ask what has made you decide to begin therapy at this time and inquire about your goals for therapy. The first session may focus on presenting issues and establishing a therapeutic rapport, which just means us getting to know each other and you becoming comfortable with me and the therapeutic process. My therapeutic style is collaborative as we work together toward your goal(s). I may assign homework and believe it can be beneficial; however, it is the client's choice if they would like to receive homework. I enjoy working with a variety of issues, including stress and anxiety, anger, relationship issues, adjustment and transition to or from college, depression, grief, and loss.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I participate in an average of two online trainings a month. I enjoy learning techniques to address trauma and mind-body techniques for mental, emotional, and physical healing. I'm interested in learning about brainspotting and polyvagal therapy.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I went through a crisis 30 years ago when I was in grad school getting my MSW. I happened to be taking a course in crisis intervention. One thing the professor said was, "When you go through a crisis, it will change you. You can decide how you want it to change you. Do you want this seemingly negative experience to make you angry and bitter with worse coping skills or do you want this situation to lead to better coping skills and a more positive outlook on life?” Since then, my mantra has been simple: ''Good things come out of seemingly negative situations.'' All of this led to me becoming a specialist in crisis intervention. Typically, most people seek therapy to address some kind of crisis, due to a traumatic event, issues in their relationship, or a crisis within themselves. Regarding cultural sensitivity, I look for the best in everyone and believe my purpose as a therapist is to help my clients focus on the best that is within them.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I'm interested in learning more about neuroscience methods such as brainspotting and polyvagal therapy.
“This led to training in somatic psychotherapy, including a clinical level of meditation that uses the body to heal the mind and the mind to heal the body.”
Interested in speaking with Mary?