Matt Maher profile picture

Matt Maher Psychotherapy, PhD, LMHC

Not Taking New Clients

Dr. Matt Maher has two areas of primary specialty: He works with first responders and their families as well as individuals with acute or chronic trauma. He is trained in behavioral psychology and works with parents and children. He also has extensive experience with couples and other mental health disorders.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Sex and intimacy
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • Parenting
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Fidelis
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I have a strong background in cognitive and behavioral approaches, and I truly see the value they have in shifting an individual’s relationship with the world around them.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
While working as a first responder, I noticed a need for services for those who help others. I completed a bachelor’s in psychology then a master’s in mental health counseling, both at Marist College in Upstate New York. Once practicing, I specialized in post-partum mental health and trauma. Then, I shifted to work in schools and the IDD/autism population, earning an advanced certificate in autism and behavior analysis and becoming board certified in behavior analysis. Finally, I earned a PhD in psychology, focusing on trauma and related treatments, including building resilience and avoiding burnout. I have continued with advanced training in EMDR, brainspotting, and other somatic treatment approaches.
What should someone know about working with you?
Working with a wide variety of clients, progress and treatment is highly individualized. For an adult or child with behavioral or attention challenges, progress may look like implementing meaningful changes in daily routine to affect positive change. For couples, it may look like an improved ability to communicate wants and needs with each other. For those with trauma, it could look like processing trauma in a meaningful way.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
With a wide variety of training and experiences, my practice has shifted over the years. I have a strong background in cognitive and behavioral approaches, and I truly see the value they have in shifting an individual’s relationship with the world around them. Over the last several years, I have focused more closely on the role of trauma, resilience, and somatic symptoms in healing.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Therapy is now more accessible for many through telehealth. The stigma has started to melt away in small increments. I am excited by how this new landscape will allow more people to access support without judgment. As a field, I expect much growth in the area of trauma treatment.
“Over the last several years, I have focused more closely on the role of trauma, resilience, and somatic symptoms in healing.”