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Matt Wolff Psychotherapy, LPC

Matt Wolff is a licensed professional counselor in practice for almost a decade. He is trained and qualified to treat individuals dealing with most mental health and emotional disorders but specializes in anxiety and related difficulties, such as depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. He is a certified clinical anxiety treatment professional.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Texas
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Provider
Profile
“I am an Adlerian therapist in orientation, following general precepts developed by Alfred Adler in the early 20th century and further defined and enriched by theorists and clinicians in the present day.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Being a therapist is a second career for me. Prior to becoming a full-time therapist, I worked in state government, public policy, and advocacy. In recent years, I have resumed efforts in some of these areas.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am an Adlerian therapist in orientation, following general precepts developed by Alfred Adler in the early 20th century and further defined and enriched by theorists and clinicians in the present day. In practice, my style of therapy relies on cognitive behavioral techniques and integrative approaches and seeks to meet the client where they are. I see my role as helping clients define their desired destination and acquire the tools that will take them where they want to go. I am a member of Generation X and accordingly have great familiarity with this group. This generation is also known as “the sandwich generation” due to many of its members finding themselves with the dual responsibilities of caring for aging parents as well as children and young adults. I enjoy working with those in the helping professions or those planning on joining them.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I read widely to educate myself on new developments in treatment in order to become a better provider for my clients. I complete continuing education beyond the level required to maintain my licensure in good standing. I maintain connections with a broad range of colleagues who have expertise in many areas and I am able to consult with them when needed and appropriate.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
In my training, I was introduced to Carl Rogers’s core conditions of unconditional positive regard, empathy, and congruence. Rogers felt these were necessary for therapeutic change. I do as well.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Telehealth has the ability to connect providers with clients over a much greater geographic area. It can also connect clients with providers who have specialized training when this may not have been accessible previously.
In becoming a therapist, what book did you find most beneficial to your learning?
Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl.
“In practice, my style of therapy relies on cognitive behavioral techniques and integrative approaches and seeks to meet the client where they are.”
Interested in speaking with Matt?